Colt Rail Gun (1911) Recoil Spring

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by FAL, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. FAL

    FAL
    Salem
    Active Member

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    I just picked up a Rail Gun which seems to me to have a very light recoil spring and no recoil buffer. I'm concerned that the frame and/or slide will be damaged by such an arrangement. The gun was professionally detailed and Cerakoted before I got it so I cannot believe a competent gunsmith would have let such a light spring stay in the gun if it was a problem.

    So do Rail Guns typically have light springs? I'm tempted to put a 16# Wolff spring and buffer in it..
     
  2. jbett98

    jbett98
    NW Oregon
    Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My 1968 National Match has a very light recoil spring due to the slide having some metal removed and using only wad cutter ammo.
    Order a Wolff variable spring pak and start with the 16# and then see how it performs. If you have any extraction issues, go down to the next lighter spring.
     
  3. Nwcid

    Nwcid
    Yakima and N of Spokane
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    Spring should be matched to your load.
     
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  4. wichaka

    wichaka
    Wa State
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    Without putting the spring on a tester, not sure how one would know exactly what the spring is.

    But a good recommendation when purchasing a used 1911...replace the springs to factory specs, that way you know what's inside.

    I run all my 1911's with a 14 or 15lb spring. The original design called for 14lbs. The industry, somewhere decided that 16lbs is now the standard, with some of the semi-custom makers using 18lb springs.

    But using a 16lb spring in the rail gun will do you fine.

    As for the buffer, that's a personal choice. I happen to use them in all my full size and Commander sized guns. They won't run in anything shorter, as it shortens the cycling stroke too much to be reliable. If one decides to use them, treat them with the respect they deserve...meaning check them thoroughly at every cleaning, and replace if cracked, chipped etc. The only ones I've seen come apart and cause any trouble, are when people have neglected them. If you're the type, don't use them.
     
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