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Red98422

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In a recent acquisition I revived a colt pocket hammer less, it seems to be a fine piece. Hanvent shot said yet as the opportunity has yet to present itself yet.

Is there anything I should be aware of when shooting this....antique pistol or should all be well? Can I just keep tuning rounds through it as a range toy or is it best kept as a “safe queen”?

I love the action, the petite grips and the seemingly simple action...I would love to shoot the pants off this thing but not sure what I should expect (other than $35 a box) in that regard
 

Red98422

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If it was me, I would have Vezley inspect it before firing it.
Isn’t he in Vancouver? Bit far from me, but I could at least see what he has to say...just sitting looking pretty at the moment
 
My wife has one. It was her grandpa's. Unless the gun shows obvious signs of abuse or neglect, I'd shoot it. We have. I'd carry it if the need be.

Neat little single action auto. Pleasant to shoot. Typical Browning/Colt. well designed, well made and neither the 32 ACP or 380 is going to beat one up from the inside.
 
I had a 1921 build, of Al Copone’s favorite gun but I did have a gunsmith go through it before I shot a whole bunch of S&B ammo from it.

Congrats…Awesome pistols!!!
 
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In a recent acquisition I revived a colt pocket hammer less, it seems to be a fine piece. Hanvent shot said yet as the opportunity has yet to present itself yet.

Is there anything I should be aware of when shooting this....antique pistol or should all be well? Can I just keep tuning rounds through it as a range toy or is it best kept as a “safe queen”?

I love the action, the petite grips and the seemingly simple action...I would love to shoot the pants off this thing but not sure what I should expect (other than $35 a box) in that regard
Mine is a 25 auto. There is also a 32 auto. The ones I've seen are sturdy little guns and will handle factory ammo, but they were designed to be something that was carried a lot and shot a little.
 

ZigZagZeke

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Shoot the hell out of it, but take good care of it. Pay close attention to the original finish. It should actually look blue.

Screen Shot 2021-06-13 at 3.04.07 PM.png

These pistols were fire blued at the factory. Many have been refinished, but that's OK. They still shoot just fine. Be aware that the original manufacture two tone magazines are VERY expensive. They run around $200. You can get an after-market magazine for about $35. Pay close attention to the caliber stamping on the base plate of the magazine. Originals say "Colt [caliber]".

These pistols were a favorite of gangsters and Humphrey Bogart's Sam Spade character in the movies. The little Colt is what he carries in "The Maltese Falcon".

Mine was made in 1906 and was my mother's pillow gun.

colt32b.jpg GunInv2016-Colt1.jpg

It came with ivory grips. I have since acquired some original Type I standard grips for it.
 
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These Colt pocket pistols beautiful handguns and a pleasure to shoot. Just shoot standard ball or standard pressure hollow points if it’s reliable with them. For gosh sakes stay away from Buffalo Bore and Double Tap or Underwood and the like. I’ve seen a couple perfectly good pocket pistols turn to junk by trying to make a magnum out of a small 32 or 380. Shoot a couple magazines now and then and enjoy a fine pistol.
 

ZigZagZeke

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Red98422

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See:


Looks like yours is a 1908 model made in 1917 if it is .25 cal. There was a .32 cal 1903 with that serial number made in 1914, but that would be a Type I, which yours definitely is not. Beautiful condition though. Enjoy and never, ever sell it. :)
Ok I’m super confused now, cause this is definitely chambered in 32...I even just checked it with some of my 32 ammo I have laying around....sounds like there is currently some sort of chicanery afoot!

I never intend to, this thing is freaking awesome! Just the fit and finish is amazing!!!! And to think how old it is, it really was a different time back then seeing the care that went into even production guns
 

ZigZagZeke

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Ok I’m super confused now, cause this is definitely chambered in 32...I even just checked it with some of my 32 ammo I have laying around....sounds like there is currently some sort of chicanery afoot!

I never intend to, this thing is freaking awesome! Just the fit and finish is amazing!!!! And to think how old it is, it really was a different time back then seeing the care that went into even production guns
My bad. Yours is a 1903 Type III, which started production in 1910. Yours was the .32 cal made in 1914 with that serial number. That'll teach me to go by memory.
 

Red98422

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My bad. Yours is a 1903 Type III, which started production in 1910. Yours was the .32 cal made in 1914 with that serial number. That'll teach me to go by memory.
Ok that’s still impressive as all hell to get even the info you have from memory!!!! Damn I’d be lucky to remember all my purchase dates by memory hahaha!

thank you for the fantastic insight to the history of this firearm! I’m hoping to get many years of service and maybe even pass this along if I ever decide to have kids. It’s certainly more than sturdy enough!
 
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