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Colt 1911 Recoil Buffer ?

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by Bigbaddude, May 12, 2013.

  1. Bigbaddude

    Bigbaddude West linn Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I shoot a lot of rounds threw Colt 1911 (70) and it seems like the recoil buffer only last about 1500 rounds is this normal?
    I usually buy a cheap 6- pack of buffers. Is there a high grade of buffers out there that last a little longer?
    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. iamme

    iamme Lane County Well-Known Member

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    There's no need to use a buffer, the way to make them last the longest is to not buy/use them. :)
     
  3. Creeper

    Creeper Ravensdale, WA. Member

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    If you want to reduce the recoil impulse in a more permanent fashion, I suggest you fit the gun with the standard 16 & 23 lb. recoil and mainsprings (if you don't use them already), ... and an EGW or Harrison Design "small radius" firing pin stop.
    The springs are self explanatory, the firing pin stop... allow me to explain.

    Your FPS has a large radius on the bottom edge, put there to reduce the effort required to rack the slide. It's not the original 1911 design, but rather a change made (1911A1 approximate) to accommodate soldiers in the field who had difficulty racking the slide with the original Browning design part... which had a small, .078" radius.

    The EGW and Harrison Design FPSs are more true to the original design. The EGW is dead square and requires the installer to establish the bevel/radius of their choice... 1/16" being a popular value. The Harrison Design part has a 3/64" radius at the bottom and a 3 degree angle above the pin hole, and other than fitting to the slide and extractor, is ready to go..

    When installed, both will reduce the mechanical advantage that the FPS/slide has to cock the hammer. This change in contact point and leverage retards rearward slide movement. The primary design benefit is for 3" and 4" guns... slowing the slide rearward speed reduces the likelihood of the slide "outrunning" the magazine spring, in particular on the last few rounds.
    On a 5" gun, the benefits are a reduction in felt recoil, no need to run a heavy recoil spring with +P loads... and the associated reduction of "muzzle dip" that occurs on return to battery when heavy recoil springs are used.

    There are literally dozens of threads on both the EGW and HD small radius FPS... with dozens of testimonials as to the parts effects on felt recoil... in particular on 1911forums, m1911.org and 1911pro.com.

    Cheers,
    C
     
    BAMCIS and (deleted member) like this.
  4. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Cheap 6-pack? The ones I have seen in a sixer seemed kind of expensive but then I have never really looked to buy any since I make my own very cheaply. Regardless of the debate I believe they reduce felt recoil and prevent frame hammering and since I make them in the peaceful serenity of my shop, use them only in my own gun and do not try to convince anyone of anything I therefore cannot be convinced to the contrary.
     
  5. Bigbaddude

    Bigbaddude West linn Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I pay $5.50 a 6 pack from Midway.
    What material do you use when you make your own?
     
  6. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    The only thing I have found so far (that is marginally satisfactory) is the dense, red rubber plumbing gasket material from ACE hardware. It comes in a package of approximate 6" squares and has .062 and .090 thickness. I use the .062 on the rear of the recoil spring guide and the .090 on the front. Seems to work ok and holds up to several hundred rounds but I would like to find some polyurethane in sheets of the same thickness. I think poly would hold up better. Use a .45 case as a punch to cut the hole in the rear one and a .357 case for the front. Align the raised rear portion of an extra spring guide in the .45 hole and trace around the perimeter with a pen and cut out with sharp, small scissors. Same for the front.
     
  7. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Tap Plastics
     
  8. Bigbaddude

    Bigbaddude West linn Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    What's that?
     
  9. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    CP buff's have a harder compound and should last many a round.

    Have had them last a few thousand rounds easy.