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Cleaing a marlin 60

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by stonedkirby, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    Got a marlin 60 the other day from a pawn shop, i believe its 1984, took it shooting for the first time today. too much fun. one jam in about the 70 rounds i fired. anyway, assuming it is that old i want to clean the essential parts of the gun before i go out with it again.

    what products do you guys recommend for cleaning and what parts should i clean specifically? Are there any parts i should check for integrity and consider replacing?

    i googled it but im at a point where i only trust my fellow members for the best advice. :) thanks!
     
  2. jordanvraptor

    jordanvraptor Oregon City, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Check the buffer for cracks, its a plastic piece that stops the bolt from hitting the back of the reciever. Given its age if it has not been replaced yet it might not last very long. I just use old school CLP for everything.
    marlin-glenfield60.gif
     
  3. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    Seeing as how you can't run a cleaning rod down it from the breech....I would use a bore snake. A cleaning rod from the muzzle will ruin your crown in a hurry. CLP is great for .22's. Use it to clean all the carbon and goop off the bolt and reciever. Be sure to clean under the extractor. A few drops down the breech before the bore snake does the job there. When everything is clean, a light coating of CLP where there is metal on metal contact.
     
  4. 9mmMike

    9mmMike Gladstone, OR Member

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    You guys clean the bores of your .22's ? I have an old Glenfield, by Marlin, and I've cleaned the bore once in the 30 years I've had it and the gun didn't shoot as good until I put another couple hundred rounds through the pipe..
     
  5. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    what about for cleaning the wood?
     
  6. jordanvraptor

    jordanvraptor Oregon City, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Don't try refinishing the wood. Just clean it up with Pledge or some other wood product cleaner.
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    As a competitive smallbore shooter, our team invited an Olympic Gold Medalist to speak, and his advice to us (for target rifles that you are practicing with regularly) was to NEVER clean a .22 Long Rifle bore. Here are his stated reasons:

    1. Modern .22 LR ammo primer compound and powder have multiple very effective non-corrosive agents in them, and the slight "leading" in the bore serves to protect as well.

    2. .22 LR barrels often do not have the same hardness of steel as say, high power cartridge barrels, hence, they can be negatively affected by constant cleaning more quickly.

    He went on to say that for hunting guns, NEVER use a brass, bronze, or stainless brush on a .22LR barrel, except in the case of a gun you know has suffered neglect and may have rust in the barrel---in reference to reason #2 above. (This advice could be modified I think for a .22 with a stainless barrel.) He advised on using a nylon brush if one feels compelled to clean.

    Taking his advice to heart, my regimen for many years has been this:

    If the gun is to be used again inside of 6 months, and has gotten no moisture in the barrel (from rain, etc.), I do not clean the barrel.

    If the gun is to be stored for a longer period of time, I may give it a moderate scrubbing with a solvent dipped nylon brush, dry with patches, then apply a lightly oiled patch (of WD, CLP, etc.) thru the barrel.

    And I'm sure most subscribers to this site know that a clean barrel (.22 or otherwise) will not shoot like it should until it has been fouled with a few rounds. I never take any rifle on a hunt with a clean bore. I put 3-5 rounds through it (serving also to confirm my sight settings by the 4th or 5th round), and then I am ready for that well-placed shot on game.

    The target tells the tale: the first one or two rounds out of a clean, dry, or slightly oiled barrel will almost always print significantly away from the group that develops by round 3 or 5. If you employ a chronograph, you will also see that velocities do not settle until then.
     
  8. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Try this to give that old gun a face-lift:

    Get a can of Johnson or Minwax paste wax (comes in a big can that looks like a Huberd's shoe grease can, or small paint can.) It's most often used for waxing of wood floors in the old-fashioned buffer method.

    Put a light coating of it on every exterior surface, (even your scope body if gloss finish). let dry, and buff it off.

    Wait! don't send your money yet! You will find that the gun shines like a new penny, water beads up on it, and fingerprints (if they adhere at all), are easily removed with a quick swipe of a dry cloth.

    For Alaska hunts, we swab it on liberally, and do not wipe it off at all. Your gun looks like ****, but is well protected throughout the hunt, from rain, blood, etc.

    No charge for this service.:)