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Have any of you ever used one of these?
There's a technique, but my first attempts yesterday didn't get much more than 60' out of the clays.
Any wisdom is appreciated.

20220814_114712.jpg 20220814_114735.jpg
 
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I've found those to be bogus.
The one-piece plastic is superior IMO.
Still a learning curve, though.
 
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My wife bought me one of those at a garage sale once. I was never able to successfully launch a clay any distance with it. I think we sold it at our next garage sale. Those red plastic ones are pretty easy to use.
 
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My wife bought me one of those at a garage sale once. I was never able to successfully launch a clay any distance with it. I think we sold it at our next garage sale. Those red plastic ones are pretty easy to use.
My shooting buddy couldn't master the plastic one.
Threw it away !
There is a bit of a learning curve with those.
 
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I've got both the Remington-type and the plastic thrower. You're not going to get high speeds or long distance from the Remington-type of thrower. Don't try to strong-arm it, they aren't meant to work that way.

Here, watch this:

I think the Remington-type are nice for teaching new shooters because they throw the clays slower and shorter. The plastic throwers are fun for more experience shooters. The quickest way to discourage a new shooter is to take the fun out of it by making it too difficult. Just my opinion.
 
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I've got both the Remington-type and the plastic thrower. You're not going to get high speeds or long distance from the Remington-type of thrower. Don't try to strong-arm it, they aren't meant to work that way.

Here, watch this:

I think the Remington-type are nice for teaching new shooters because they throw the clays slower and shorter. The plastic throwers are fun for more experience shooters. The quickest way to discourage a new shooter is to take the fun out of it by making it too difficult. Just my opinion.
Thanks for the knowledge - since I have both, I can take different shooters out together.
 
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I've found those to be bogus.
The one-piece plastic is superior IMO.
Still a learning curve, though.
My dad bought one of those red plastic throwers back in the 70's.
All it ever did was break the clays.
I've heard the same results from others.
The wood handle one the OP asked about is superior, but like you say, there's a bit of a learning curve.
I'd be good with a 60' toss. That's the average distance I usually shot a bird at.
FWIW, last time I shot clays in a field, we just tossed them by hand (no thrower).
Worked out fine, although it showed me I desperately needed a butt pad for that gun.
 
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Reading these responses is somewhat fascinating. There seem to be people in all sorts of different camps as far as difficulty of use. I really haven't had much difficulty at all with the red plastic throwers but will admit it has been a struggle at times (when it's my turn to do some shooting) to show others how to use one. I don't recall ever having a problem with breakage, except when using one of the mechanical throwers that you cock manually. It was finicky and I kept having to check to see the gap was set correctly. Using clays that have been stored awhile can also be a problem.

I've got a contraption where you attach two of the red plastic throwers to a handle extension for throwing doubles. You swing it like a baseball bat and on a hot day it can be quite a workout. That one is also a little tougher to get the knack of.

As for the wooden handled one, our experimentation with it preceded Youtube. Otherwise, it would have made for a pretty hilarious video. Not one of our group ever got it to work even remotely well enough to shoot at the clay pigeon. After reading this thread I suspect we were trying too hard.
 
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I've thought about those over the years. But then I realize I don't average even one clay pigeon shoot per year and start thinking about how it will just be one more thing to constantly move out of the way in my shop. :s0068:
Yep if you don't use it it will take up a corner of the garage.
We use mine every time we go shooting.
And we duck hunt so it helps with practice in the off season.
 
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The plastic ones work pretty good.
But we usually go shooting with 5 or 6 people in the group.
So if you have to throw a 100 or more clays in a day your arm is going to be sore.
 

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