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fronts always fixed. guessing since all glock rear sights are adjustable you just tap it. otherwise it could be like the mos version and you can move the field goal. just never seen anything like that by truglo
 
I am looking at the TruGlo TFX sights. It says adjustable. What does that mean exactly? I've never "adjusted" what came original on the gun, should I have?
The rear sight would be adjustable.
Your OEM Glock sights were not adjustable.

The only TruGlo TFX sights I've been around were non-adjustable.
In that configuration the rear sight has tritium tubes.

I suggest you study your options some more and make sure you want this sight system.
Here are the typical sight pictures....everyone has a favorite.
Sight-Image-NavyGuy.jpg

What I do is to use the issued sights and note the POA/POI
Then if I like it, I measure (digital calipers are cheap now) the sight heights above the slide and go shopping for my replacement sights.
BEWARE that any sight system sold by Glock includes the depth of dovetail in the rear sight description.
You have to minus .080"/2mm to get the actual height above the slide.

If you need help figuring out what height sights you need for your preferred SIGHT PICTURE, there are sight calculators at Dawson and Ameriglo...

Simple measuring and basic math will show you the way !
 
I've never "adjusted" what came original on the gun, should I have?
Are you hitting where you aim?
If so, then no adjustment required.
Fiber optic on the front is helpful and all I've used on my Glox.

I do have an adjustable rest sight on my G34 because it came that way. Doesn't matter anyway because I cannot hit anything with that gun now that I've been shooting my CZs.
 
To the best of my knowledge, the TFX sights are only adjustable for windage by drifting the rear and/or front sight a small distance to the left or right and have no elevation adjustment. To accomish that you would use the same tools you would use to remove the old sights and install the new sights.
 
I'd suggest looking at them first. The TFX wouldn't be my first choice. I prefer Ameriglo for an affordable option.
 
To the best of my knowledge, the TFX sights are only adjustable for windage by drifting the rear and/or front sight a small distance to the left or right and have no elevation adjustment. To accomish that you would use the same tools you would use to remove the old sights and install the new sights.

How do you "drift" the front sight on a Gen 5 Glock? My Gen 4 G34 has a screw inside the slide that posts into the center of the front sight... no adjustment possible.
 
I'm currently using Big Dot sights on my G34... I really like the open rear sight for quick aquisition. But I may go back to the Heinies that came with it when I bought it.

Heinie-315-50-Glock-Slant-Pro-50-Sight_main-1.jpg
 
Glock front sights aren't adjustable and many of the aftermarket options are for windage only. Oddly enough the factory rear sights on a G34 ARE elevation adjustable.
 
The rear sight on a Glock is adjustable.
You would push it right or left.
The front is fixed.
I have tried so many different sights on my Glocks it's crazy.
I mixed a set .
XS BIG DOT FRONT.
and a blacked out rear. I can't remember who makes it .but it works pretty good for me.
And I am able to rack the slide one handed on belt or pants pocket.what ever. MVIMG_20190809_221815.jpg MVIMG_20190809_221829.jpg MVIMG_20190814_212229.jpg
 
True adjustable sights can be adjusted once mounted.

Usually look similar to this.

1565844255086.jpeg

All dovetail or slotted fear sights can be adjusted left to right via pushing them in the channel left to tight. The Truglos are that type of sight. In theory they are set and forget sights as once zeroed, you'll never touch them again and shouldn't need to.

If you are using the Glock for home defense, I'd say the Truglos are great, I run them on most of my Glocks.

If for range use or target practice I'd say a true adjustable rear sight like above and a thin fiber optic front sight like posted above by @bbbass
 
the more I look down the sights I do like the ones that are on it, I just feel like when I have them lined up the end of the gun is tipped downwards slightly.
Are you hitting where you aim?
If so, then no adjustment required.
Fiber optic on the front is helpful and all I've used on my Glox.

I do have an adjustable rest sight on my G34 because it came that way. Doesn't matter anyway because I cannot hit anything with that gun now that I've been shooting my CZs.

I tend to hit low left to begin with. It may have some to do with flinching in anticipation, but I do a lot of drills and have been improving on that, yet I still hit low left unless I aim high.
 
the more I look down the sights I do like the ones that are on it, I just feel like when I have them lined up the end of the gun is tipped downwards slightly.


I tend to hit low left to begin with. It may have some to do with flinching in anticipation, but I do a lot of drills and have been improving on that, yet I still hit low left unless I aim high.
Low and left is due to not holding the gun correctly. I did not know this was true until my wife and I took a training class at AFT in Gresham. Afterwards we were both hitting dead center.

 
the more I look down the sights I do like the ones that are on it, I just feel like when I have them lined up the end of the gun is tipped downwards slightly.


I tend to hit low left to begin with. It may have some to do with flinching in anticipation, but I do a lot of drills and have been improving on that, yet I still hit low left unless I aim high.
Striker fired pistols, such as the Glock can cause a right-handed shooter to hit left.
The final 30% of the Glock striker spring is being compressed during the "press" (trigger pull).
You have to develop proper grip and trigger finger contact.
Many Glock shooters have given up on learning proper mechanics and drift their rear sight to the right to compensate for this.

For practice, with the pistol unloaded, balance a coin on the front sight and see if you can keep it there during dry-fire.
One thing that has helped my grip on a Glock is to drive my support hand thumb into the frame forward of the trigger guard. (keep your thumb away from the slide !)
If your frame is too big for your hands, you will not be able to do this comfortably.

A shooting buddy has small hands and grips his P320 waaay back....the whole pistol wiggles around.
Hard to watch....LOL
He is getting a small frame for his P320 and that should instantly improve his shooting.
 
the more I look down the sights I do like the ones that are on it, I just feel like when I have them lined up the end of the gun is tipped downwards slightly.


I tend to hit low left to begin with. It may have some to do with flinching in anticipation, but I do a lot of drills and have been improving on that, yet I still hit low left unless I aim high.
Low and left is due to not holding the gun correctly. I did not know this was true until my wife and I took a training class at AFT in Gresham. Afterwards we were both hitting dead center.

^^^This^^^

Your problem of shooting left may be caused by the muscles in the right hand (strong hand for most) not being balanced by the left hand (support hand for most). Try using more pressure/grip with the left hand.

The shooting low may be caused by an improper trigger pull. Ensure that you are "pressing" the trigger straight to the rear with the pad of the finger and not using your right hand gripping fingers to aid a "pull" of the trigger.

I like the coin drill mentioned above. Another you can do at the range is have a friend load an unknown number of shells into the mag (Edit, the last shell has to be a dud or a fake/plastic round)... when firing those, when you get to the surprise, notice what happens to the sight... Sights pulling off the X will tell you that you are flinching.

Dry fire practice your improved grip with a laser on the X until you can do it without pulling the sights off the X. Then try it at the range with live ammo... if anything changes, you are flinching.
 
Last Edited:
I tend to hit low left to begin with. It may have some to do with flinching in anticipation, but I do a lot of drills and have been improving on that, yet I still hit low left unless I aim high.

What helped me to fix this same issue, was increasing the grip pressure of the off hand. Squeeze more / firmer. Trigger hand stayed the same.

This issue can come back when switching from a full size double stack, to a smaller or single stack - as you might do at the range or for fashion when going out.

I don't advise making a compensation by holding over - holding to the right. (you may do that due to circumstance of a given shot - but not all shots) If you have to use a different firearm, that habit could lead to a bad outcome.
 

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