Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Bugging out... in 1936 Siberia.

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Sun195, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,081
    Likes Received:
    375
    An interesting story about a family of "Old Believers" - a fundamentalist Russian Orthodox sect - who moved out into Siberia to escape persecution in 1936. They lived there without any contact with other humans until discovered by a Russian geology team in 1978. It's some real "Swiss Family Robinson" type stuff - but with a lot more more suffering, starvation and cold.

    You want to talk about really bugging out? These folks did it. All the way.

    For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine

    It's a pretty good read and shows just how tough people can be.
     
    ATCclears, Toxic6, just dan and 3 others like this.
  2. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,443
    Likes Received:
    7,644
    Another really good book to read is called "Crusoe of Lonesome Lake" written by Leland Stowe.
    After surviving WWI, a man "Ralph Edwards" hikes into the NW Canadian wilderness and single handed carves out a working farm.
    Him and his daughter were responsible for saving the Trumpeter Swan from extinction.
     
  3. Kevinkris

    Kevinkris Aloha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    444
    interesting.
     
  4. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,187
    Likes Received:
    290
    Wholly cow!!!!!!

    I was in Samara Russia in Feb of 2006 and it hit -42 C. That was cold but that family had it cold. Dang.

    SF-
     
  5. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,081
    Likes Received:
    375
    I found this part striking:

    So, basically, this guy just chased animals around until they collapsed from exhaustion. Having chased a deer up through some woods this past hunting season, this just seems unbelievable. I can tell you who'd collapse first if it was me doing the chasing. Oh, and the fact he was running around barefoot in the winter....
     
    Grunwald and (deleted member) like this.
  6. HansC

    HansC Portland Member

    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    92
    The story is astounding. Thanks for posting this.
     
  7. Bushman

    Bushman Auburn, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    392
    This sounds a bit far fetched....Sleeping out in the open in that weather for days? Barefoot? lol OK...
     
  8. mrblond

    mrblond Salem OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,942
    Likes Received:
    1,763
    People do what they do. Remember this area is just north of Mongolia, not up in the arctic. I would guess the climate would be much like inland British Columbia.
     
  9. Bushman

    Bushman Auburn, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    392
    I get that, but BC ain't exactly forgiving most of the year. Areas so secluded where you don't have human contact here in WA would be difficult to survive without proper equipment.
     
  10. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,081
    Likes Received:
    375
    Part of me is a little skeptical about this story, but Smithsonian is a pretty reputable publication and it was just a cool story, so I decided to share. Make of it what you will.
     
  11. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    7,524
    Likes Received:
    10,460
    I couldn't run down a hot dog! Thanks OP, Ill check this out!

    PS: Wow! That was some story! Gives a good idea of just how tough Russians can be.
    It reminds me, in just a small way of Lt. Hiru Onada of the Imperial Japanese Army. An intelligence officer, Onada was stationed in the Philippines in 1945 and while hiding from US forces missed the Japanese surrender! His last orders had been to hide with his squad and comense guerilla warfare after the island was overrun. For over thirty years, despite losing his squad mates, he carried out what little operations he could manage against the local population. Finally in 1976 he was persuaded by his former commander to surrender! At least he had a kinder climate than these poor Russian folks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
  12. eganx

    eganx Kingston WA Active Member

    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    163
    That is how humans used to hunt......by injuring and out enduring the animal. Humans are built for endurance.....
     
  13. Boomerang

    Boomerang Portland area Active Member

    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    204
    I've read that the aboriginal people in Australia hunted like that as well. Just follow the animal until it lays down and dies from exhaustion.
     
  14. mrblond

    mrblond Salem OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,942
    Likes Received:
    1,763
    yeah, I saw this as well. I also saw that they measured fossil footprints and by taking the length of the stride they think the Aboriginal people could run faster then Bolt could sprint.
     
  15. slimer13

    slimer13 Deer Park Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    3,181
  16. theguncrank

    theguncrank Columbia County Active Member

    Messages:
    314
    Likes Received:
    160
  17. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    Likes Received:
    1,175
    Tough maybe but stupid certainly.
    It is not rocket science to make a bow and arrows. All you need is a knife, or if you are really in the stone age a sharp stone will do.
    You can also setup traps without any advanced modern tools.