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Bucket Packing....questions...

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by DakotaMom, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. DakotaMom

    DakotaMom Central North Dakota Member

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    Alright...I have my 5 gallon food grade buckets that I bought at the bakery for $2 each with the lids.

    I ordered my mylar bags and oxygen absorbers and watched the video on how to smoosh the air our, then seal using a home iron and a metal level.

    OK...so what do you guys all bucket pack??

    Rice, Flour, Beans, Cornmeal, Sugar??, Oatmeal??

    I haven't seen anyone mention bucket packing the sugar or oatmeal. I wasn't worried about brown sugar, as I have a bunch of molassas already picked up and know how to make brown sugar from molassas and white sugar.

    Any other tips you might have would be great!!!
     
  2. DakotaMom

    DakotaMom Central North Dakota Member

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    Oh yeah...do you freeze the flour for awhile before you bucket pack it? I saw that mentioned somewhere, something about bug eggs in the flour.
     
  3. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

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    I just thought I would mention that one of the best places to buy some of those bulk products is from a local Mormon organization. You don't need to be a Mormon to do this, I'm not. There is a price list posted here somewhere. They also have the ability to seal number 10 cans.
     
  4. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    +1

    search for providence living under the LDS websight. I picked up a case of hard winter wheat in 6, 1 gallon #10 cans with oxygen absorbers in the can for $17.00.

    The dry pack cannery has hard red winter wheat, pinto beans, long grain white rice and quick oats readily available. There is one link that has all north American locations. Save alot of time and money on just those items alone.

    SF-
     
  5. DakotaMom

    DakotaMom Central North Dakota Member

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    I'm in ND...I don't think we have any Mormons here. Definitely no LDS church. I did a search...appears the nearest Family Home Storage place is in Minneapolis...8 hours away.

    So...back to my bucket packing.... getting hard red spring wheat is no problem...I have 70,000 bushels in the bin right behind our house. :laugh:

    I'm not at all worried about storing HRSW...heck, we had some in a bin that sat there for 25 years with very minimal spoilage. Sold it on the open market with absolutely no problems. 95% of the grain on our farm was grown in the last year. So, if a SHTF type of situation occurs, I would probably have my hubby clean some of the grain and bucket pack it then....

    I guess I'm more looking to bucket pack basics like the rice, flour, sugar, and oatmeal....it would make life much easier if you didn't have to mill the flour before you used it. :)
     
  6. DakotaMom

    DakotaMom Central North Dakota Member

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  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Someone asked about freezing first. No, oxygen absorbers will stop things from growing or living. Freezing won't kill everything.

    Also, I don't store flour. I store whole grain because it's more stable. All grains keep longer if left whole. Then you need grinders for both wheat and corn. Extras are nice in case one breaks.

    Don't forget your sourdough starter and print googled recipes. Ebay - San Francisco starter is cheap.

    You can make a substantial meal by soaking whole wheat overnight, and then cooking and eating it whole. Some sugar and salt goes well too. Don't forget sugar and salt. You can just cook and eat rice.

    Honey lasts forever even if it crystallizes. It simply doesn't spoil.

    +1 I'd rather have a year's worth of basic food than 3 months worth of fancy stuff.

    $.02
     
  8. wheretheheckami

    wheretheheckami Vernonia, OR Member

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    Question for you experts.

    Packing 5 gallon buckets with things like wheat, corn makes sense because they reduce considerably after grinding. With other things, it makes more sense to me to pack different things into each bucket...it would take us a long time to go through 5 gallons of dried beans. What I was thinking of was to pack beans, rice, split peas into the produce bags (with the little holes), pkgs of pasta. Vacumm seal things that give off strong smells like spices and things that absorb odors/tastes like powdered milk. Place them in mylar w/o2 absorbers and seal.
    Does anyone have experience with this? I've heard some suggest that dried legumes, rice, pasta would absorb odor/taste from each other. Anyone know for sure? Thanks.
     
  9. UrbanMan

    UrbanMan SW United States New Member

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    I have some "ready" buckets with vacuum packed foods: rice, beans, pasta, steel cut oats, wheat bran, peanuts, brown sugar, coffee, teas, salt, adobo seasoning, chicken and beef boullion powder.

    I have also vacuum packed salt and boullion in smaller packets then put them into my large mylar bags of rice and beans, which are then vacuum packed with oxygen absorbers. Same thing with large bags of macaroni - vacuumed packed separate smaller bags of powdered cheese and garlic powder into these larger bags.

    I have smaller vacuum packed bags, individual sized for my bug out bags, mostly mac and cheese, rice and boullion, peanuts, and, oatmeal and brown sugar.

    For my Bug Out Bags I also vaccum pack other essentials like toothpaste, tooth brushes, bar soap, dental floss, fire starting kits, and even small clothing items like socks, long sleeved t-shirts, etc.

    I wrote a post on my site about the smaller vacuum packed bags:
    Urban Survival Skills: Urban Survival - Food Stockpiling

    regardss all,

    UrbanMan