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Boyds Stock Questiona

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by nwwoodsman, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I'm getting ready to order a Boyds stock for a Ruger M77 MKII 30-06. Just to triple check can someone confirm that I should be ordering the long action stock?

    Also has anyone had any experience doing this? I'm an amatuer when it comes to doing any type of gun work. Is this something a guy can do himself at home with no experince or should I head to a gunsmith?
     
  2. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    Yes long action...

    They are easy to do, just some light sanding and stain.. I did an 03 Springfield this week and it took me 45 min of finish sanding and then linseed oil. Came out perfect!
     
  3. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Use a stain sealer before staining, it helps give a nice even appearance to the stain. I prefer a gel stain, makes it more manageable.
    For a tough finish, I use Tru-Oil by Birchwood Casey. Rub 4 ought (0000) steel wool between coats.
    I would have a gunsmith bed the action after putting the finish on.
     
  4. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Just about everything you can do to a rifle that doesn't require a lathe or mill, can be done by the average gun owner. Replacing a stock is a pretty common DIY project. I would recommend that you start checking out the numerous web videos on the task, as well as those that show how to pillar bed a rifle. Experience is what one gets by doing! Look at the videos, understand the process, then exercise the most important talent of all, patience. Don't rush any task you undertake.
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    I agree that it's hard to beat the Tru-Oil finish. Last year I fininshed a hand carved stock (from an un-turned blank) for my old 1903 Springfield sporter. Followed some oldtimers (older than me) on applying the finish. First, DO NOT seal the stock. Sand with the finest practical sandpaper so ALL tool, machine, sanding, marks are removed.

    For the first application or two of the Tru-Oil, use a 50-50 mix of tru-oil and mineral spirits (paint thinner). You want as much as possible of the tru-oil to soak in as possible. Let dry well. By well, I mean at least 24 hours, maybe more. I hung mine in the garage on a piece of welding rod (coat hanger good too)

    After you've applied enough of the 50-50 Tru-Oil mix to eliminate any areas of porosity, after dried, then start with the coats of un-diluted Tru-Oil. Follow the schedule of One Coat per day for Week, One coat a week for a month, one coat a month for a Year, then one coat a year forever.

    0000 steel wool between every coat.

    I prefered to apply the full strength Tru-Oil with just my bare hands. Helps feel any areas that need some more steel wool work before the next coat. Some will also use 600-800 grit wet/dry sandpaper with the diluted Tru-Oil at the early stages.

    Patience pays off.

    Here's what I started with: (It's not exactly the same blank but I forgot to take a "before" pic. This is the same shape and similar wood)

    RifleStockBlank.jpg

    and here's what it looks like today:

    034.jpg

    033.jpg

    BTW, this rifle started out as a "surplus" 1903A3 purchased in 1950 for $12.85.

    Today it still has the original barrel stamped 10-42, a timney sportsman trigger, an A-4 Bolt (with bent handle). It shoots 3/4" groups @100 yards with handloads and it gets shot regularly.. Holds sub MOA out to 300 yards which is the max I've shot it at. The action is pillar bedded with Devcon from tang to about 1-1/2" forward of the recoil lug. On this type rifle one only needs to add a pillar at the rear actions screw as the forward portion of the bottom metal forms a pillar and acts as part of the recoil lug.

    Not bad for a rifle that was born the same year as I was. Was my dad's rifle, and when I pass it will go to one of my 4 grandsons, maybe even to my only granddaughter.

    034.jpg

    033.jpg

    RifleStockBlank.jpg