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Bow Saw

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by ATCclears, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering this:
    BAHCO 10-30-23 30 Inch Ergo Bow Saw for Green Wood - Amazon.com

    Does anyone have any input?
    - is one manufacturer generally of better quality than another?
    - is the size of the one above good, or too large? I'd likely use it on trees and tree limbs with a diameter of 8" or less
    - useful life of a blade?

    I have a chainsaw, but it requires fuel and (of course) is quite noisy.

    Thx,
    Peter
     
  2. Widerstand

    Widerstand Portland rebmeM roineS

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    I have not used that exact saw but I have used other saws from BAHCO and I like them, quality is good and the same goes for the price.

    30 inch's a good size, my bow saw is 28" and I have been happy with it. I use it fairly often and get about one summer out of a blade.
     
  3. fyrediver

    fyrediver Seattle Active Member

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    I've got several bow saws, not that model though. They're great but the very thin blades can get bound if you cut the wood wrong. They can get pinched quite easily when the wood flexes. You just have to cut in a way that the cut opens rather than closes.

    I'd suggest buying a couple extra blades as well.

    I carry a 21 Sven collapsible saw in my vehicle. It's great, lightweight, and cuts through wood like butter!
     
  4. rocky3

    rocky3 oregon coast Active Member

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    I have had many bow saws and they all worked fine. My advice is to get a good file and learn how to sharpen the blade. When new the blade was not sharp enough.
     
  5. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

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    I have had and used them, they do wanders and do not require gasoline, oil nor can people heard them 3/4 of a mile away in the middle of nowhere

    :thumbup::thumbup:
     
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  6. HansC

    HansC Portland Member

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    Bahco used to be called Sandvik. They've been making great tools for a million years. I have Bahco bow saws in the trunks of my cars. Great for clearing a downed tree in the road after a storm. Extra blades are super cheap, get them the same time you get the bow saw. Bahco makes blades for green and dry wood. A bit of diesel fuel makes a good lubricant to help keep the blade from sticking while sawing. So long as the wood you cut isn't dirty or muddy, the blades stay sharp a long time. To my knowledge, these are the only non-Chinese bow saws on the market. They rock. For small jobs, like getting a downed tree out of the road, faster than a chainsaw, since there is no prep, and they're quiet and don't use fuel.

    Best bow saw out there.
     
  7. loucfir

    loucfir Pacific Northwest Active Member

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    Bahco...great saws!
     
  8. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

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    I have a 30" Bahco saw - it works great. Definitely a step-up from a Sven Saw (which I also like, but is a bit smaller). Bahco has a 36" model, but I found that a little unwieldy. I think you should be able to tackle 8" trees/limbs with this, but would get tiring. It'll buzz through smaller stuff in the 4-6" range.

    Sven Saw is great for packing around, but the larger bow saws can just tackle more.

    Not sure how to quantify blade life. My Sven Saw (just for example) still has its original blade from 20+ years ago, but not sure who much wood I've actually cut through in that time. I've used the Bahco on a few small trees around my property and Christmas trees for the past five years.

    If you are ever in the U-District, stop by Hardwicks as they (often) have the full line of Bahco saws and many other types. They also have a great selection of traditional tools, Grunsfors axes, woodworking tools, oil lamps, etc, etc. Well worth a trip.
     
  9. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    They are good saws, you can resharpen them with a fine file. The teeth are slightly off set and (with great care) you can re-set the teeth as they wear down
    I have switched to straight saws as they are much easier to use when clearing tree limbs my saw is double edged about 20" mand if I cut wedges ahead of time I can cut a pretty good sized tree
     
  10. PolishedBrass

    PolishedBrass Gresham, Oregon Active Member

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  11. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    I have curved blades as well, even have one with carbide teeth (ouch $).
    I setteled on straight saws because of my experience on the PCT during my unsupported trek of several hundred miles using a single horse. Trees fall across the PCT especialy along steep terrain. The NFS depends alot on voulenteer workers (Like me) to keep the trail clear for hikers (first) and horses (dead last). A large tree can block the trail at any time of year despite honest efforts by all involved. A big, downed, tree requires the use of wedges to keep the saw blade from being pinched and frozen in place, you cannot cut wedges easily with a curved saw. Same goes for a chain saw, you need wedges to keep the blade from being pinched, frozen for eternity!
     
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  12. simpleguy

    simpleguy Clackamas Active Member

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  13. Crunchtyme

    Crunchtyme Manchesterish New Member

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    I keep a Silky Super Accel in my go bag, cheap $10 Fisker's folding saws in each vehicle, and a folding Bow saw in the Jeep. I cant count the times I have had to clear a branch or ten from the road after a storm, just to get home.
    I like the Silky for most of the work, But the Folding Bow saw makes firewood piles fast.
     
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  14. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    BAHCO saws are an excellent brand! I like and use bow saws a lot in the yard and garden. I have BAHCO folding pull saws in my truck and in my Bonsai tool box. Can't go wrong!

    PS: Silky saws are very good too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  15. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    I was driving out of town today and a large aspen was down, it had taken down a power pole as well. I looked around and there were a dozen smaller trees down in the nearby fields
     
  16. gunfreak

    gunfreak Boise Well-Known Member

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    Watching a Peter Kummerfeldt’s video he explains how a bow saw is limited in the depth you can cut, the distance from the blade to the top of the bow.
     
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  17. mpgunner

    mpgunner Redmond, WA Member

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    I should check on the brand of my bow saw. I've had it 25 years, never changed the blade and still cuts great. I have to be careful when I use it because it seems the blade could cut my finger off in one stroke.
     
  18. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Golly,loggers have cut trees for 100s of years without using wedges (yes they use them for falling trees in the right direction)

    BECAUSE THEY KNOW HOW TO USE THEM.

    If you know how to use your saw,you don't need a wedge.
    look to see which direction the stress is. Is it sagging or is it bowed up?
    Sagging? Cut the top first and then finish from the bottom
    Bowing up? Cut the bottom first and then finish by cutting the top
    Then you won't need wedges.Just cut a little at a time then go to the other side.
    Been doing this since I was as tall as a bow saw
     
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  19. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

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    Well I have not bought one yet, been dumping $$$$$$$$$$ on debt. But I have put one on my wish list for either June or July, June preferably July if I just do not have enough cash. June I am planning buy a new weed wacker Professional Grass Trimmers - Professional Use Gas Powered Trimmers | STIHL USA Mobile not sure which model number yet someone I know has a stigl cannot remember the model number I thought it was an FS 190 and they love and it gets a heck of work out 3 yrs running no issues and Husqvarna chain saw Professional Chainsaws - Chainsaw and accessories, reviews and comparison charts | Husqvarna probably some like a model 562