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boresighting question

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by stonedkirby, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    So i recently aqquired a Husqvarna 1640 30-06 Mauser Rifle. I love it. However, i just put a nikon prostaff on it, and a couple days ago i realized that the iron sights/blade ( whatever ) near the tip of the barrel is gone. There is a rectangular patch of adhesive residue or something and some rust. it leads me to believe that piece was always there until recently. I DID however have it boresighted by the guy at four corners general store. so my question is, for boresighting, will that part normally be removed for it to be done? because at least if this piece is gone i wont feel like a such a douche knowing it wasnt my fault. And then theres a tiny chance the people at four corners have the piece...if they didnt get rid of or sell it already. i dont know. i just want that piece back!
     
  2. rodell

    rodell Newcastle, WA Active Member

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    There's no real relationship between those sights and boresighting. They may have removed a piece if it interfered with the scope, but that would be the rear piece. I suppose they might have removed it because you wouldn't be using it. That would only be done if it were in the way of the scope sight line, not because of boresighting.

    Call 'em up, see if they have it.

    Bob
     
  3. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    solid, ill call them tomm. thanks!
     
  4. dobeman

    dobeman Hillsboro Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    was it there when you got the gun? if so, maybe indeed someone removed it for whatever reason where you took it for boresighting. But boresighting - either with the laser or looking through the breech end of the bore would NOT require it be removed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2010
  5. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    if that is the case, why wouldnt this guy assume i wanted that piece back? i mean he works at four corners...very dumb. i hope he has it, because im certain thats where it must be now. I know he didnt give it back to me cause all he handed me back was my rifle
     
  6. dobeman

    dobeman Hillsboro Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    oops... I mean would NOT be required. typo :eek: they had no reason to remove it for boresighting, was my point.

    If you know for certain it was there before, seems logical it got knocked off.

    If it never was there.. some folks cut those off when they 'sporterize' rifles.
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I'm having some trouble figuring out why anyone would pay someone to boresight a gun. It's about as easy as taking out the garbage or checking the oil in your car, and a lot more enjoyable and productive of tangible results.

    Maybe I'm missing something here. Unless its an auto, pump, or lever (not Marlin) where the bolt cannot be easily removed, its about a 10-minute operation and requires no equipment whatsoever.
     
  8. stonedkirby

    stonedkirby WA (Clark/Cowlitz) Member

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    1. i never said i paid for it, he did it for free.

    2. i dont know the procedure but a link to the process would be swell

    i called the place and they said they have it, i just have to go pick it up. the guy that did the sighting didnt answer so i couldnt ask why it was removed. who knows. at least i know where it is!
     
  9. JUSTIficatioN

    JUSTIficatioN Seattle, Wa Member

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  10. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    My apologies for the assumption you paid the shop. Here's what works:

    1) Unload the gun. (Yes, it had to be said.)

    2) Secure the gun on a rest of some sort. Lacking a gun cradle/vise, sandbags or such will work. You want something that will hold the gun relatively still, but still allow some adjustment to where its pointed.

    3) On a bolt gun, remove the bolt so you can see thru the bore. Marlin lever gun bolts are also easy to remove.

    4) Peer thru the bore at a small "target" (this can be anything that appears smaller than the bore, and stands out in contrast to surroundings: top of a fir tree, dark cowpie in a pasture, white tip of a metal fence post, etc.) Of course, an actual target is good. Small round bull is best. Your "target" should be at least 100 yards away, but specific range is not critical, and if you can't get 100 yards, a little less will work.

    5) Center the "target" exactly in the view you see thru the bore. You are pretending this is the bullet's-eye view. You are the bullet.

    6) Now, without moving the gun, raise your eyeball to peer thru the scope. If your rest is not solid, you can get away with a hand trying to hold the gun still, raise your head to look thru the scope, then look thru the bore again to make sure the gun has not wobbled away. Switch views back and forth to make sure the target is still exactly centered in the bore.

    7) Your crosshairs should show the error, and relative need for adjustment. Remember: when you look thru the bore, you are the bullet. So, if your crosshairs show to be high and right of the target, the gun would actually shoot low and left. In this "crosshairs high and right" scenario, you would move your scope dials up and right.

    8) As you move your scope dials, your "bullet's-eye view" and the view thru the scope should begin to correlate, and when you have it perfect, the target should be centered in the bore, and the crosshairs should be dead-on the target, with the gun not moving.

    This method is almost certain to put you "on paper" (8x11) at 100 yards.

    Additional suggestions:

    I get better results doing this at night, and using for a "target" a streetlamp or other light that is 100 yards away or better. Seems to center in the bore more accurately.

    This method works far better than any "Boresighter" device I have ever tried, and I've tried just about all of them. Some are absolutely worthless and would serve better as a target that you actually shoot at. The only time I might employ a "Boresighter" device would be on a gun where a view thru the bore cannot be easily obtained, and ammunition is in extremely short supply. (I would actually rather sight the gun in with live ammo at 25 yards, then work my way out to 100 or so.)

    NEVER hunt with a gun that is only boresighted. Although this method would probably easily give you "minute of ribcage" accuracy at 100 yards, the game animals we hunt deserve the respect of tools that are precisely adjusted for a clean kill. ALWAYS sight your gun in with live ammunition, NEVER trust ballistic tables to tell you where it might shoot at a given range, and NEVER shoot at a game animal at a range you have not actually practiced at.

    Permission granted to make this a "sticky" if anyone knows that procedure.

    No charge for this service either, and drive safely.