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Books?

Discussion in 'Northwest Fishing' started by Patriot1668, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. Patriot1668

    Patriot1668 SW Washington Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    I've fished my whole life, but not much since moving to the Northwest. The first time I shopped for tackle I thought the clerk was kidding when he recommended all sorts of bright colored spinners, spacers, and beads.

    Any recommendations on good books and printed guides to NW shore fishing?
     
  2. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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  3. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Dark lures for dark days and bright lures for bright days.
     
    rick benjamin likes this.
  4. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    I didn't "catch" shore fishing
     
  5. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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  6. mkwerx

    mkwerx Forest Grove, OR Well-Known Member

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    John Shewey - an Oregon based author, has a series of books about fishing the northwest. Shewey is a fly fisherman but there's a lot of good info in there that a non-fly guy can glean on not just where to fish, but when and for what.

    And being in Washington, there's a good chance that wherever you located from in the US - there are fisheries that have fish you already know how to fish for. Washington has a very good warm water fish stocking program, and they put more hatchery cold water (salmon, steelhead, trout) fish in their rivers than Oregon does. There's a reason we have dwindling returns and streams moving to one-fish per day limits and five or ten per season in a region, while Washington has streams with 3 fish per day hatchery limits, that sometimes get bumped up to 5... but I digress.

    YouTube is another good source of info, believe it or not. Lots of good info on what to use, how to use it, when ti fish for certain species. Just gotta sort through some BS sometimes.

    It's good to have an assortment of both brightly colored lures, as well as dark, subdued lures no matter what you're targeting.

    Not to divert business and click revenue elsewhere, but the Oregon Fishing Forum has a host of good members and good info that certainly applies to Washington's fisheries as well as far as tactics, techniques, and gear. I think there's a more Washington centric forum called Piscatoral Pursuits, but it might not be in business anymore. Never spent much time there.

    Good luck.
     
  7. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    What species of fish are you targeting and what part of the state will you be fishing in?
     
  8. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The hardest to catch and by far the most exhilarating will be Steelhead fishing.
    You would be well advised to get some lessons from someone that knows how to fish for them.
    The gear isn't too expensive, but it's critical to be using the right bait or lure, or else you will be wasting your time.
    The easiest way is the set line plunking method and hardest will be casting upstream into a river and letting the lure/bait bounce off the bottom.
    You can use the same methods with Salmon.