Blue Printed Action

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by PORSCHE928S4, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. PORSCHE928S4

    PORSCHE928S4
    Newport, Oregon
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    I have a question for you seasoned riflemen out there about action blueprinting. I have seen a few rifles for sale and the owner advertises that the action has been blueprinted which is fine .The question I have is if you had this work done it most likely is expensive and well shouldn't you have some paper work to support the blueprinted action claim ? I personally would have the reciept or something proving that the work was done kind of like a rifle pedigree.
     
  2. erudne

    erudne
    The Pie Matrix
    PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing?

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    It's a pointless statement, all it means is that the parts fall within MFGs specs not that the pats are fitted and matched better in anyway than how it comes from the factory
     
  3. 2506

    2506
    Seattle
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  4. PORSCHE928S4

    PORSCHE928S4
    Newport, Oregon
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    Wow thank you 2506 that is a ton of info on Blueprinting
     
  5. Cameron72

    Cameron72
    Harrington, WA
    Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Without paperwork verifying the work done nobody really knows what they mean. It could be just like MILSPEC or within the Manufacturer spec all the way fitted and mated parts.
     
  6. jonn5335

    jonn5335
    Longview
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    Blueprinting isn't all that expensive generally $250-500. Considering all the money a person could potentially dump into a semi custom rifle if built right they most like won't skimp on blueprinting. If you are really worried about buying a rifle that may or may not have been blueprinted ask the buyer if you can check to see if the locking lugs have been lapped. Lapped lugs do not guarantee that the action has been blueprinted but it is a good sign that it has been. You could also ask which smith did the work and talk to the smith. One gunsmiths version of blueprinting can vary from another. Or you could just buy a true custom such as a stiller, defiance or surgeon to name a few as they are all blueprinted before they leave the shop.
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch
    Forest Grove, Oregon
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    "Blueprinting" is a term frequently tossed about, and in specific reality has never been defined. (I wish it was.)

    What you might get from someone selling a gun having been "blueprinted", is a list of measurements from the gunmaker stating tolerances of bolt-lug lockup, machine work he has done to achieve that final result, headspace tolerances he set the barrel at, etc. To this extent, you have your "blueprint": measurements at time of fitting.

    There is great and undeniable benefit in having a skilled barrelsmith (note I did NOT use the term "gunsmith") fit your barrel perfectly to your action and working your bolt to specific tolerances that in his experience have produced good result. Perhaps this is what is meant by "blueprinting". Car guys can supply their definition for comparison, but I think the term suffered in translation to the gun field.

    Near-perfect alignment of the barrel to the action along with near-perfect engagement of the recoil lugs are something that gun factories don't spend much time on. Paying someone to do it afterward is a decision that the rifleman needs to make for himself. Unless he is a constant precision shooter and handloading his own ammo, he will never benefit from the significant outlay of funds necessary for the "blueprint".

    The guns these days from the factories are so damned good.
     
    orygun and (deleted member) like this.

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