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blown primer problem

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by finch6013, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    Lately I have been experiencing blown or ejected primers in my AR. I have had about 1000 rounds down the tube with no problem then all of a sudden I have had three in about 150rnds. I was using PMC and now have started using Lake City reloads from ammo man. Is it just his loads? or is there a problem with my gun? also is there any problems with my gun that could come from having this happen?
     
  2. kevlar

    kevlar Mt.Angel Active Member

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    Lake city reloads would have to have a swaged primer pocket if they are over swaged they could just be loose. But it could also be a dangerously hot load. You would probably notice the bolt slamming back pretty darn hard.
     
  3. ETViking

    ETViking Keizer OR New Member

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    In my experience ....bulging or blown primers indicate high pressure. That normally means too much powder and or bullet is seated too deep. Probably will not hurt your firearm. The danger is that it might hurt you! I would not shoot those particular reloads. Just my opinion.
     
  4. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    I have not noticed a hot load as it was in competition so I was shooting fast and in the moment. So I dont really notice the gun much. I did notice that when trying to dislodge the stuck casing there was alot of smoke from the gun.
    Does the casing being stuck point to anything?

    I can see someone saying is the gun 5.56 or .223 and its 5.56 so that should not be the problem
     
  5. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Try buying 1 box of factory Remington 223, or Winchester white box, or both, and fire 1->5 rounds.

    Check each spent case after each round fired.!

    If you experence no problems after checking each shot... then I would feel fairly sure it is the reloads.

    If all is still happening after the very first factory round, you have a potential problem with the firing bolt group, lockup and all in the 223.
    STOP SHOOTING untill you fix the problem with a qualified AR smith.
    worn locking lugs, or previous hot loads, and hot gun from relatively rapid firing have stressed something.

    I doubt it will be the AR, However, please see what real factory loads do before you go pouring water on the ammomans ammo, or the gun.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2009
  6. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    No pouring water on his reloads. Other than the primer issue I love them. I get great accuracy with them at a reasonable price.

    I tend to not think its the gun since it does not do it every round. Just about every 50-100.

    I will try some factory pmc as I know my gun likes that stuff and see what happens. I have checked all the parts and cleaned them very well and cannot see anything wrong with them. Although I am not a gunsmith
     
  7. ETViking

    ETViking Keizer OR New Member

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    More smoke usually means more gun powder.
     
  8. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    it was alot of smoke. twice as much as normal. it even got some comments from people watching as to how much smoke was coming from the mag well and every other crack
     
  9. kevlar

    kevlar Mt.Angel Active Member

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    Theres always alot of smoke whem a primer pops out
    and was the case stuck or did it pop right out?
     
  10. Oldfart

    Oldfart Portland Member

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    If you can't find the solution by taking the steps already suggested, get a digital scale -- the kind used by reloaders -- and weigh a bunch of the rounds you normally shoot. It might just be the reloads have too much powder in them.

    The brass weighs a certain amount, as does the bullet and primer. Those aren't likely to vary much so if there is any apreciable variation it will have to be in the amount of powder.
     
  11. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    case was stuck and I had to use the old pull back on the charging handle and smack it against a rock to get it free
     
  12. kevlar

    kevlar Mt.Angel Active Member

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    Ok well thats definately a high pressure sign. seated too deep or too much powder.
    definately check your ammo. It seems to me that is your most likely cause.
     
  13. JAFO

    JAFO OR, USA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    Is this reloader going to replace your upper & bolt/carrier when it KBs? The manufacturer isn't likely to. I'd recommend that you run factory ammo or your own reloads.
     
  14. rudedog04

    rudedog04 oregon-roseburg Member

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    theres alot of primers now at bimart 6 1/2 small rifle primes are for 22 hornet not made for 223 7 1/2 benchrest are for 223 some relaoder just get the wrong small rifle primer
     
  15. rudedog04

    rudedog04 oregon-roseburg Member

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  16. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    I definately wont be using what I have left of the ammo. that being said anyone want to buy it:laugh:
     
  17. NoAim

    NoAim Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    This is patently wrong. There are huge variations in brass weight alone. Unless you're looking for a half/no/double charge you won't see it. You'd have to pull the bullet to actually look at variations in charge weight.
     
  18. finch6013

    finch6013 Oregon City Active Member

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    ya I kinda figured that. Although I dont reload so I wasn't sure. thanks for your help guys. good to know that it is more than likely ammo and not the gun. But I will test with some normal .223 and see what happens.
     
  19. Oldfart

    Oldfart Portland Member

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    NoAim, that's exactly what he's looking for. I've weighed a lot of brass and it seldom varies by much more than a couple of grains. A variation in powder of a couple of grains wouldn't cause the problems he's seeing. It'll take a five to ten grain boo-boo to give him a stuck case and a blown primer.

    Of course the powder might be wrong too. That's the problem with reloads made by someone else -- the reloader might have grabbed the wrong powder when he made that particular batch. Another very good reason to do your own reloading.
     
  20. NoAim

    NoAim Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    If the reload is already pushing max loads, a "couple of grains difference" beyond max could show up at popped primers.

    So stacking all your tolerances, +/-2 grains for brass, +/- 1 grain for bullet = useless info. The entire spread from min to max load on .223 using Hodgdon's manual is only 2.5 grains itself. That "little" of a difference will get buried in the variance of the brass and bullet and you won't be able to tell anything. You can't really get too much of an overcharge in .223 (unlike pistol rounds) since you're almost at case capacity with most powder (average load is ~24 grains, case capacity before getting compressed loads is ~26.5gr).

    Very likely, since it is reloads I'd assume a couple of things:
    - The primer pockets were swaged (mil brass) and a bit oversized.
    - The loads are trying to push velocity and are using a medium-higher load.
    - Combine the two, and you could easily get popped primers on .223.