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Best position to shoot from Marksmen?

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by JackThompson, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    I haven't gone hunting in 17 years. Went 3 times as a young buck myself and got nothing. The local rose valley/cougar areas were infested with hunters and I never got the shot. It's probably for the best as I would have likely just maimed some poor animals then.

    I'm a better shot now, but I still have some work before I'm confident I can do myself and the deer justice.

    My question is, if I'm spending my 39.06 Ammo judiciously during practice, should I work on prone, kneeling or standing? (I'm assuming the position you practice in applies best to the position you take your shot in?)

    I'll probably be hunting near Yacolt this year, in fact I've seen deer roaming the 5 acre property I'm moving to in a week. (Can you shoot a deer on your property if you have you license/tags??)
     
  2. Varmit

    Varmit Beaverton, OR Member

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    I practice for all positions (except prone). I never expect to have an opportunity in the woods to use prone. If I were after antelope or other prairie game I would probably practice prone. I have been watching some of the hunting shows on TV lately and a lot of the hunters are using shooting sticks or portable bipods/tripods. If you have the time to sit and use shooting sticks, that should be more accurate than prone (without a rest). I think sitting with elbows supported on knees or alongside thighs is the best for woods hunting, and with practice dropping, down from a walking position can be as fast as any other position.
     
  3. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    Shooting sticks, that's interesting! I might have to try that. I've found that just standing and bringing the gun to my cheek leaves with with a lot of wobble. I'll try kneeling, I had some luck with that.

    What about leaning in trees? (What hunting shows do you watch?)
     
  4. Varmit

    Varmit Beaverton, OR Member

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  5. jonn5335

    jonn5335 Longview Active Member

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    I would work on free standing shooting and using a tree as a rest
     
  6. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    Shoot at an animal in whatever position you're most comfortable in, but practice them all just in case. I dislike shooting in the prone position almost as much as I hate stabbing myself in the eye with a red hot tire iron but I know people who will only shoot at an animal this way. I had about two seconds to shoot at the elk I shot two years ago and drilled it in the kill zone as fast as I could get the scope on her. Did it standing up and without a rest. Just do what works for you.
     
  7. jake2far

    jake2far Portland Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Sitting and kneeling will be the best followed by standing. In most situations you need to be up off the ground to clear ground, growth, and obstructions. Practice using a sling. Terrain will dictate position. It depends on your type of hunting, walking/stalking will be fastest offhand followed by kneeling. If you position hunt, walk to a position and sit down, sitting will be first followed by kneeling, kneeling will get you slightly higher.
    You control what position by your style of hunting.
    Sling, sling , sling, it is one of the best aids to accurate shooting.

    Jim
     
  8. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand Southern Oregon Coast Well-Known Member

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    JackThompson If you are moving into the woods out in the county and safe enough to not hit the neighbors house or TV set and it is a legal area to hunt, than yes you can kill the deer in your yard. Save the does you will have more bucks as the years go by. They like apple trees and in the fall you might get a pie or two to go with that venison.
    Interesting A man whom wants to cast or just improve himself in the arts of shooting. I answered your thread.
    I think back and after the first fifteen years of practice I realized it was the .22 rim fire rifle that was giving me the best advantage in all positions. I thought further and made the consideration to get a bolt action .22 rim fire[The gun should reflect your big bore action] as I was shooting mostly bolt action rifles at game.
    This consideration led to noticeable improvement's in my shooting skills, at the least cost.
     
  9. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys :)

    And thank you Silverhand for your advice in the bullet casting thread as well. I consider myself as one of those people who was born in the wrong century. I appreciate and admire all of the technology that makes our life the easiest that history has ever known, but I also like to feel wood shape itself beneath my hands. I like the satisfaction of knowing that I made something that will serve me well, or last a long time.

    As a computer architect I see my work become obsolete and useless sometimes in as little as a months time. There's little joy in that.
     
  10. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Practice kneeling, sitting, offhand and occasional prone. REALLY practice using rests or braces! Learn to stalk tree to tree pausing at each tree or possible rest. Everyone wobbles, practice controlled breathing, trigger control and calling your shot. Once those are mastered here is how I shoot off hand, don't try to hold your muzzle still, get your site picture and draw a tiny circle around the point that you want to hit. At the bottom of the arc bring the frt site up to your desired impact point and exactly as you stop carefully squeeze off the shot. Do not stop and then shoot. It is much easier to control movement than holding a still position. Also stalking is an art! None of us will ever be perfect at it. There is much literature devoted to how to stalk. I hope that this was helpful and good luck on your hunt!
     
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  11. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand Southern Oregon Coast Well-Known Member

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    JackThompson There was a time I felt the same way exactly. Wanted waterwheels in New England to make the power for my dreams in my life ahead.
    You are on the right track - do one thing and do it right then another.
    I have learned [For Myself] as working class citizen during better times Money is nice But not having enough time to do what one wants is being poor.
    Learn about the wood forever but do not let it consume you.
    If you have space the item can have more value than money. Choose carefully!
    Get a nice .22 and some targets Kick back and shoot slow. It will come to you sooner than you think. Once a week or a few times a week. But not more than 50 rounds each outing.
    That is how I started shooting and it works- I still think of the old timer who passed that on to me. Short Gentle old man From the Bronx NY, he took the subway and the bus to the range.
    He had three pen like zip guns he built, in his shirt pocket. During a timed pistol shoot one day my confidence was down. He noticed this and handed me a glass of wine. I almost refused in fact tried to. I committed and drank the wine. When the bell hit I started to fire and when the smoke cleared and the targets rolled in I saw one hole in the ten ring and a 9 Score 299 of 300.
    I learned how to shoot that day at least for awhile.
     
  12. Torqk911

    Torqk911 Yacolt,Wa Member

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    I live in Yacolt as well. It depends on where you think your going to hunt honestly. I would practice standing up at all angles realistically. The slopes of the hills will be your biggest obstacle. This is my first year out in a long time as well. Been practicing like crazy though with cheaper ammo.
     
  13. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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  14. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the links PB. :)

    Most of the 5 acres are mountain at the edge of forest and mountain land with neighbors to 1 side. I'm right there with you on knowing your target and what lies beyond.
     
  15. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    Do you need a nusiance tag to shoot deer on your land? If you want to encourage deer on your property may i suggest a mineral block and start a small patch of deer cane or other food source.
     
  16. Red Ryder

    Red Ryder Washington New Member

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    You've gotten some good advice on which positions work well. I would practice standing and kneeling. You probably won't have much time to get into a prone and there is usually tall brush to contend with anyway. If you use a tree as a rest, have your hand on the foregrip and place that hand against the tree. Do not rest the gun directly against the tree. That may mar the finish. It's easier to position the hand on the tree and maintain a good shooting grip on the rifle. Getting some practice time in with a .22 is a great, cheap way to work on your shooting skills.

    Another thing you need to check on are the hunting regulations for your area. If you are hunting in GMU 564 (Battle Ground) or GMU 554 (Yale), there is a firearm restriction. Get a copy of the current game regs. Read page 79 where it lists those 2 areas as having restrictions. Read what hunting equipment modern firearm permit holders may use in those areas. Your rifle might not be allowed.

    If you're not sure if you're in those areas, get a GMU map from L.C Smith company. They are in state and are prompt on sending maps. Make sure you pay them. If you have an I-phone, check out sportsmanregs.com .
     
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