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gmerkt

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Most of the burger joints in my area have gone down the toilet, the only place that is halfway decent now imo is Kidd Valley
Same experience for fast food type places in my area. If the dining rooms ever opened in late 2020, they are closed up again. Drive through only, which I never liked even pre-Covid. Sometimes, their menu board or squawk box doesn't work. You must wait to place the order until you get to the window which adds time to every transaction. Hours have become unreliable due to staffing shortages. The experience has caused me to curtail such "dining." Probably that's for the best.

There is one place where I can walk in and get a burger, Shake N Go in Lynnwood, Korean ladies run the place and they make a pretty good burger for $9.

There are some fancier places open again that serve excellent burgers, such as Salt and Iron in downtown Edmonds, but they aren't fast food priced.

I haven't been to a Kidd Valley in years, their places are farther south from me and kinda off my beat. But I used to go there with a couple of pals of mine who lived down there. They're both dead now and sometimes when your friends are gone like that, you fall away from some formerly mutually agreeable venues.

Re. horse meat. When I was a kidd (joke there), my mom used to feed our cats and dog ground horse meat. She got it from one of the local butchers. It wasn't in his white and glass meat cabinet; you had to ask him for it. He'd go around to the back somewhere and bring it out wrapped in white paper. My mom would cook it up in a big Wearever pan, then keep it in the fridge. The solidified slick of fat on top got served to the animals just as the lean did, they didn't seem to mind.
 
Dinty Moore too but it’s only good for a few years on the shelf. It has enough calories to feed a small family - this from a 20oz., can:

5A34F24A-E051-4D12-97F9-0A8BBDB684F0.jpeg C0F43EB8-549E-4030-8B31-90820285249D.jpeg
 

OldBroad44

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Fat is good. I was watching Alone on antenna TV the other day and one guy was literally starving to death even though he had been eating tremendous amounts of the musk ox and wolverine he had killed. Something had stolen his bucket of rendered fat from a 7' high open platform he had built to prevent same. What a dope!
Right. Protein Poisoning, aka Rabbit Starvation. You get it by trying to live just on rabbit or other lean meats without enough fat or carbohydrate. Other lean meat can include carabou and various other lean game including venison especially toward the end of winter. One problem is the brain runs only on the sugar glucose. So if we have only protein we have to make glucose from protein for our brain to work as well as provide energy for the body. Only our liver can do this bit of metabolism, and not all that well. Our liver is at max capacity producing only about 35% of the glucose we need from protein. And it dumps waste products from the reactions into the bloodstream (ammonia, amino acids), overwhelming our kidneys ability to clear such stuff and causing toxicity. Meanwhile, we are starving for fat, carbohydrates, and micronutrients. Symptoms of rabbit starvation include fatigue, nausea, weakness, diaghrea, constant hunger, and death. The diaghrea starts about a week into the all rabbit diet. A person can gorge on rabbit and die with full belly feeling desperately hungery.

Interestingly, rabbit does have fat. But what fat it has is not under the skin or marbled in its meat. It's stored around the interior organs. So if you are in a situation where all you have is rabbit, eat the whole rabbit. Including the (fatty) brain, eyes, bone marrow, organs and fat around them, stomach and vegetation in it, and intestines. The source I read didn't say anything about the gall bladder; I'd skip that. Or about the small intestines and colon. I suspect eating those with contents might help nutritionally. Cook everything in a way that avoids losing any fat such as in a soup or stew. I don't know whether you could prevent or stave off rabbit fever on an all rabbit diet by eating the whole rabbit. But if there's plenty of rabbits you could add the fatty inside and brains of several extra rabbits to your stew.
 
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Right. Protein Poisoning, aka Rabbit Starvation. You get it by trying to live just on rabbit or other lean meats without enough fat or carbohydrate. Other lean meat can include carabou and various other lean game including venison especially toward the end of winter. One problem is the brain runs only on the sugar glucose. So if we have only protein we have to make glucose from protein for our brain to work as well as provide energy for the body. Only our liver can do this bit of metabolism, and not all that well. Our liver is at max capacity producing only about 35% of the glucose we need from protein. And it dumps waste products from the reactions into the bloodstream (ammonia, amino acids), overwhelming our kidneys ability to clear such stuff and causing toxicity. Meanwhile, we are starving for fat, carbohydrates, and micronutrients. Symptoms of rabbit starvation include fatigue, nausea, weakness, diaghrea, constant hunger, and death. The diaghrea starts about a week into the all rabbit diet. A person can gorge on rabbit and die with full belly feeling desperately hungery.

Interestingly, rabbit does have fat. But what fat it has is not under the skin or marbled in its meat. It's stored around the interior organs. So if you are in a situation where all you have is rabbit, eat the whole rabbit. Including the (fatty) brain, eyes, bone marrow, organs and fat around them, stomach and vegetation in it, and intestines. The source I read didn't say anything about the gall bladder; I'd skip that. Or about the small intestines and colon. I suspect eating those with contents might help nutritionally. Cook everything in a way that avoids losing any fat such as in a soup or stew. I don't know whether you could prevent or stave off rabbit fever on an all rabbit diet by eating the whole rabbit. But if there's plenty of rabbits you could add the fatty inside and brains of several extra rabbits to your stew.
years back, i saw a doc on Stalingrad. a German Dr at the front was seeing men suffering from starvation even though they were getting enough calories. found out the meat paste they were issued did not have enough fat. They were issued reformulated paste with more fat and some of those who had it died from the shock of having the extra fat I guess..

but ya, fat is important..

also, saw that woman who went to the North Pole solo had a diet of olive oil.. only olive oil.
 
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My grotesque digression to continental shenanigans aside, to answer my own question:

  • Canned corned beef. Make sandwiches, tacos, with an egg for breakfast, burritos, etc. with said. Most are Argentinian, Australian, and Brazilian corned beef, in roughly that order.
  • Various ground or sliced chunks in cans. Though most aren't the best tasting, they still provide protein, fats, etc.
  • Jerky. Both store bought and home made. One of my brothers makes some truly great jerky.
  • We used to store pemmican, but haven't in some time.
And likely some others I'm forgetting.
Just made a batch of corned beef hash last week using canned corned beef--it's almost scary the way vegetables are absorbed by the corned beef
 

OldBroad44

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Ducks have fat under their skin
Right. Very delicious fat if its a farm raised duck (that doesn't have access to too much fish which taints the flavor of fat and eggs.) Pekin ducks in particular have a lot of fat, but all breeds of ducks except muscovies, a different species, have good amounts of fat, and always in a layer under the skin and not as marbling in the meat.
 
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Re. the canned corned beef from So. America (in the weirdly shaped cans) and the canned beef or corned beef hash. As mentioned previously, all very salty. Worse, very fatty. In an emergency, you don't need to get jippy tummy on top of everything else. Might be a better thing to stock up on canned tuna and salmon, easier on the digestive tract. Canned fish is salted, but not so much as beef. Heck, most canned vegetables contain plenty of salt.

At a garage sale one time, I was given a can of the beef people get at some food banks. Surplus USDA, I guess. Plain label. It was in chunks, very tasty I have to say but high fat content.

The canned so-called roast beef in gravy, I've yet to taste any that I've liked. Some of it comes from eastern Europe, some canned here. The pictures on the labels never live up to what's in the can in appearance or taste.

Canned chicken, which we used to call boned chicken, is probably better for you than the canned beef products. It can vary in quality. Shop the brands and try one of each. I've had some Hormel's that was very good; some others were barely edible. Boned chicken was one of my favorite C rat menus.

Dried beef products, much better for you than canned. Unless you dry your own, the commercial product you buy is salty and usually contains other chemicals. The dried beef in the little glasses has almost zero fat but is highly salted. I have one recipe that I use it in, calls for soaking in plain water to remove the salt. It's expensive and wouldn't feed many mouths in an emergency.

After reading about the detective ladies in Botswana, by coincidence I had a chance to buy some ostrich biltong. It wasn't to my taste. It was pretty dry and hard.

Dinty Moore's beef stew. I used to like it when I was camping in the desert as a teenager. Last time I tried it, I couldn't eat much. Products sometimes change over the years; or maybe my palette. Origin of the name: Dinty Moore's was a famous eatery in NYC and their signature dish was a style of stew. Some time along the way, Hormel's bought the trademark name.
That reminds me: I have had the Kirkland canned chicken and it's surprisingly good. The canned salmon, which I expected to be good, was. Now I'm going to have to get a can of that Dinty Moore just to see what it's like now.


This is me. When I see threads here about hitting the trail during a SHTF situation, I think, "I don't even have hiking boots anymore." Why hike out to some survival nest only to run out of meds? I might as well be comfy and eliminate the hike. I have a bad left foot anyway, I'd never make it to my destination even if there was a pile of meds at the end of the trail.
I'll just hole up and drink liquor and shoot looters. Maybe trade liquor for some pot. Haven't had any of that in years.


Right. Protein Poisoning, aka Rabbit Starvation. You get it by trying to live just on rabbit or other lean meats without enough fat or carbohydrate. Other lean meat can include carabou and various other lean game including venison especially toward the end of winter. One problem is the brain runs only on the sugar glucose. So if we have only protein we have to make glucose from protein for our brain to work as well as provide energy for the body. Only our liver can do this bit of metabolism, and not all that well. Our liver is at max capacity producing only about 35% of the glucose we need from protein. And it dumps waste products from the reactions into the bloodstream (ammonia, amino acids), overwhelming our kidneys ability to clear such stuff and causing toxicity. Meanwhile, we are starving for fat, carbohydrates, and micronutrients. Symptoms of rabbit starvation include fatigue, nausea, weakness, diaghrea, constant hunger, and death. The diaghrea starts about a week into the all rabbit diet. A person can gorge on rabbit and die with full belly feeling desperately hungery.

Interestingly, rabbit does have fat. But what fat it has is not under the skin or marbled in its meat. It's stored around the interior organs. So if you are in a situation where all you have is rabbit, eat the whole rabbit. Including the (fatty) brain, eyes, bone marrow, organs and fat around them, stomach and vegetation in it, and intestines. The source I read didn't say anything about the gall bladder; I'd skip that. Or about the small intestines and colon. I suspect eating those with contents might help nutritionally. Cook everything in a way that avoids losing any fat such as in a soup or stew. I don't know whether you could prevent or stave off rabbit fever on an all rabbit diet by eating the whole rabbit. But if there's plenty of rabbits you could add the fatty inside and brains of several extra rabbits to your stew.
Thanks for that last part, because there is no way I'm eating rabbit colon. :rolleyes:
 

Lilhigbee

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I haven't done it, but I've thought about canning ground beef. I thought it would be good for tacos or spaghetti. I have canned spaghetti sauce with ground beef in it, though.


We've canned ground beef several times. Good stuff!! With most canned goods you sacrifice some flavor or texture, but with hamburger, at least to me, you improve it. Start with lean hamburger, 93% is what we use. Brown the hamburger enough it doesn't turn into a wad of cow, put it in the jars with the typical 1" headspace and cover with beef broth, again to the 1" headspace. 11psi for 75 minutes for pints and you are good to go. We've canned it with taco seasoning already in it also.
 

Certaindeaf

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That reminds me: I have had the Kirkland canned chicken and it's surprisingly good. The canned salmon, which I expected to be good, was. Now I'm going to have to get a can of that Dinty Moore just to see what it's like now.



I'll just hole up and drink liquor and shoot looters. Maybe trade liquor for some pot. Haven't had any of that in years.



Thanks for that last part, because there is no way I'm eating rabbit colon. :rolleyes:
But it's connected to the larynx.. think of the Bone Tomahawk party favors frivolity!
 

OldBroad44

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I haven't done it, but I've thought about canning ground beef. I thought it would be good for tacos or spaghetti. I have canned spaghetti sauce with ground beef in it, though.
The delicious beefy flavor requires browning. You get little beefy flavor if you just boil or steam beef. Raw beef doesn't have much flavor either. This is why to make chili or beef soup/stew you brown the meat first. I think if you just can the meat without browning it first it won't taste like much.
 
The delicious beefy flavor requires browning. You get little beefy flavor if you just boil or steam beef. Raw beef doesn't have much flavor either. This is why to make chili or beef soup/stew you brown the meat first. I think if you just can the meat without browning it first it won't taste like much.
Absolutely agree. Making borscht, stew, french onion soup -- or anything with burger - if you don't brown the beef, you're missing a TON of flavor. Same goes with carmelizing the onions or crushing the garlic.
 
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