bedding the recoil lug

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by james2562, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. james2562

    james2562
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    I am preparing my stock and action for bedding. I have looked around and seen lots of different way to do it. Most folks tape the recoil lug to one extent or another. One reputable source does not recommend taping the recoil lug. He says to just wax it up and place it in.

    It seems to me that taping the recoil lug creates a gap equal to the thickness of the tape. Removing gaps is one of the things bedding is supposed to accomplish. Consequently I am not in favor of taping the lug.

    But to only wax the lug and hope the hardened epoxy releases the lug and that the action can be taken in and out of the stock easily seems iffy.

    Does anyone have any thoughts?
     
  2. orygun

    orygun
    West Linn
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    By saying "wax" I assume you mean the release agent that's supplied with a glass bedding kit. If you don't allow some amount of space you may not be able to remove the stock from the barreled action. If you do get it apart you may have a heck of a time getting it back together!
    I would apply a piece of tape on the front side of the recoil lug. This way you'll gain a little space to make it easier to remove and replace the stock without affecting the bedding.
     
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  3. james2562

    james2562
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    Good thought. Thank you very much.
     
  4. the4thshake

    the4thshake
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    No tape on the rear of the lug as said above. Throw some tape on the outside of the stock around where you are bedding to catch any that squeezes out. Make sure there is release agent on every nook and cranny that you don't want bedding to be. Lots of release agent on the action bolts...lots. Just snug them down....not too tight.

    Good luck and have fun. :)
     
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  5. ridnjon

    ridnjon
    vancouver wa
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    Defiantly no tape! Make sure you have good amount of release agent on and near the lug. Also make sure you have taken enough material out of the stock that will give enough thickness for bedding material, not too thin.
     
  6. MountainBear

    MountainBear
    Sweet Home, OR
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    I've done it both ways. Without a piece of tape on the front of the lug, it can be tight to remove the action and possibly damage the bedding later. If you don't tape, be very cautious every time you remove the action from the rifle. It's a trade-off, same as everything in gunsmithing.
     
  7. james2562

    james2562
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    Is thier any particular way you recomend removing the action when you have a tight fit? Or do you just recomend a more judicious use of force when tapping/banging it out?
     
  8. jbett98

    jbett98
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    I've seen the action bolts removed and longer ones installed, and then they were gently tapped with a mallet.
    Seemed to work just fine, but there was a lot of care taken to make sure that there weren't any areas not liberally coated with the release agent.
     
  9. MountainBear

    MountainBear
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    I generally use stockmakers screws.

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...6645.aspx?psize=96&avs|Manufacturer_1=FORSTER

    If I am concerned about the bedding, then I will back the screws out, and like jbett98 said, gently tap them with a mallet. It removes the action in a straight up motion, lessening the chance to damage the bedding. If I've taped the lug (which, honestly, I do more often than not), then I generally just tap the barrel on the padded bench, and assuming I used proper release agent, it pops loose.

    A quick note: If you get a bedding job that won't release, stop short of breaking the stock. Find either a chest freezer or a walk-in freezer and leave the gun in it overnight. Sometimes that will contract the metal just enough to release without breaking things.
     
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  10. james2562

    james2562
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    Thank you very much for sharing your experience and practical tip.
     
  11. vic

    vic
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    I've taken modeling clay and built up a taper on the front of the lug and it seemed to work pretty good.
     
  12. Velzey

    Velzey
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    I always use one layer of blue masking tape on the front of the lug. Just makes it easier to get the action in and out for cleaning thru the years.
    Also, after a few really tight ones I always place the entire rifle in the chest freezer for at least an hour. I had an incident once that cost me a stock...
     
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  13. Rick4070

    Rick4070
    Central Oregon coast
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    Also, it is worth a thought about putting some tape on the bottom of the recoil lug, that way, you are snugging the action down on the action, and not putting pressure on the bottom of the lug.

    Another thought, if the release agent on the threads of the action screws, either the regular screws or stock makers screws isn't enough, and the screws wont turn, a soldering iron applied to the screw heads will make the epoxy soft, and allow the screws to turn...
     
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