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Becoming prepared

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by cbzdel, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Hi all first post here.. Been lurking for a while and had to register because something in the FS section took my eye :D

    I am 25 and newly married, I talk to my wife about becoming prepared for SHTF moments and such but she doesn't take it seriously, she says nothing like that will never happen here. That being said I am on my own for our ability to survive in the SHTF moment.

    So my question if what are the minimums??

    I dont have alot of storage space so I cant store huge amounts or stuff, I would really like just a small duffel bag. Is this considered a BOB??

    What should go in there though..

    I currently have things like this:
    Guns - Dont know if they are necessary but I have them, my ammo supply looks like (400) rounds 9mm, (2000) rounds 22lr, (60) rounds 30.06, and I will be getting into 5.56/.223 here soon.

    Water Purifier - I have a small backpacking pump action water purifier, it has worked great in the past, I have purified things as dirty as a mud puddle just to see if it would work hah!

    and well, that's about it for the SHTF moments, I may have other key items but they are just not coming to mind.
     
  2. jmh119

    jmh119 Hillsboro, Oregon Member

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    Welcome to the forum!
     
  3. jdub75

    jdub75 PNW Well-Known Member

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    There are some good lists for emergency bags around. Even on FEMA's website. The hardest thing I'm finding is trying to keep the bag a reasonable weight if you did have to carry for a long distance. So, I've been going to the gym as part of my preparedness.

    Items that come to mind:

    Emergency blanket/sleeping bag (those little silver ones)
    rain poncho
    fire starting kit (carmex, cotton balls, lighter & matches in waterproof container. Maybe one of those magnesium ones too)
    Food (I have mixture of freeze dried (liteweight, but need water) and MRE's (Heavy)
    Water (I keep a canteen attached to my bag & a few pouches of water that's good for like 5 years)
    First aid items
    Comfort items (toothbrush, deoderant, soap/hand sanitizer, Wipes)
    Knife, saw
    flashlite
    cash (I also keep a few silver coins in mine)
    copies of ID's
    change of clothes
    candle
    painkillers
     
  4. unionguy

    unionguy Portland Active Member

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    I'd recommend getting some food supply going, start with 2 weeks build up 3months to a year as you can afford. Start with basics: having a plan for food, water, shelter should lead your list, in my opinion. Then, some means to defend them. For example, I would recommend dealing with your food/water/shelter before buying an AR and ammo; as you already have some firearms to defend yourself with.

    Food/Water/Shelter disruptions are the most common situations you will encounter (natural disaster, unemployment, etc).

    I recommend just buying more of the food you already eat and then rotating stock as it comes up near its expiration dates.

    Good luck, lots of great information on this forum. I'm also a huge fan of FerFal's blog; who describes how he survived in Argentina in their economic collapse in 2001. You'll find his site by googling "ferfal".
     
  5. Randini

    Randini Salem Member

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    Hi and welcome, my wife is the same way I find that just getting some extra canned foods that she likes is one way to keep more food on hand, but mostly I just build a little at a time so she will not get too freaked out, good luck on the prepping.
     
  6. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    With the exception of food is something like this a good start?
    http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/BUGOUT-1.html

    I am sure I can make a similar kit from walmart for about 1/4 the price haha

    (but I am not sure about the shower, really necessary?? in an emergency I would not be worried about showering for a long period of time, and thats only if your water supply is so abundant you dont have to worry about it, imo)

    edit: if that above kit is far to small how about something like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/ASAPs-Survival-Bug-Out-Bag/dp/B002NLQHGK
    (again make it myself to save on the cost)
     
  7. jdub75

    jdub75 PNW Well-Known Member

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    That amazon kit is nice, but I think you could do the same for quite a bit less. Pick up one of the backpacks like that at LAPolicegear.com or local surplus place, and start putting things in there bit by bit.
    In a month or 2, you'll have that same kit for less I bet.
     
  8. Arkarayne

    Arkarayne Medford, OR Member

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    My girlfriend is suprisingly supportive of my preparedness purchases. Even wants to learn to shoot :cheer: .... :angeldevil:?

    Over the last year or so i've bought stuff, small bits here and there that'll help in the long run. most recently a, I think it was dubbed "Get Home Bag" by its originator, modified slightly by myself. it's a small day-pack/1.5l camelbak, about 100 bucks worth of stuff went into it. but it'll be going with me once it's complete. i'll be making 1-2 more soon as the money allows.

    Think small, kits, home improvements, non-perishable stocking, gas cans, water jugs, it's the small things that'll bite you in the end.
     
  9. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Funny thing is she is really into shooting but she thinks being prepared is dumb haha.. I guess its just the cub scout in my saying do it!

    About 7 or 8 months ago the wife (gf at the time) tells mes she wants a gun of her own because I was buying another one for myself. I tell her she can use one of my to make sure she is into it, because she had never been into it before.. She insisted on if she was to get into it she wanted her own gun. I said you have (2) choices, a $100 HiPoint 9mm or use one of mine. She took the HiPoint and not to stray completely off topic but its been the most reliable gun in out collection! She now also has a pink walther p22 and a pink ruger 10/22.
     
  10. TAT2D

    TAT2D Portland Member

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    Consider that you're buying in quantity and not worried about dinner tonight. You can wait and shop opportunistically -- wait for the 'case sale' at cash-n-carry or wherever. Pick up used/serviceable bits as they present themselves.

    Weigh the bug-in vs. bug-out question. I've concluded it'd take a pretty dire situation for me to think I'd fare better away than at home. But a get-home bag is a lot like a bug-out-bag.

    MrB
     
  11. dave

    dave Independence Member

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    I second the lapolicegear.com bag. I think its called the "bug out pack" or something close. $29.95 great deal.
    May as well pick up some paracord as well if your gonna pay to ship it.
     
  12. Andy

    Andy Aurora, OR Active Member

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    I think this is the pack everyone is talking about: http://www.lapolicegear.com/diplomat-3-day-backpack1.html

    Looks like a great deal. I'll have to consider upgrading.

    As for "bug-out", I'm not sure everyone is really capable of that. Unless you have lots of experience surviving on your own, your best bet is to stay home. That's why I've made up emergency pack for my girlfriend and I. If your wife doesn't believe that SHTF can happen, that's fine. Just tell her that you want to make an emergency bag for things "normal" emergencies. Just recently we had a bit of a snow storm and lots of people where stuck for up to 8 hours in their car. There was also a couple a year or two ago that got lost in the snow - the guy died trying to find help. A bag like this would have really come in handy then. Consider the bag a helpful item to help you get home where everything else will be.

    As for what to put in it, start with the basics. Water (1 or 2 liters), food, blankets, extra clothes (socks, underwear, etc), knife, flashlight, wind-up/solar radio, pen, paper, etc. Later you can move on to more detail. I even have Potassium Iodide tablets in case of the "nuclear" scenario - they take up no room, they are cheap, and your lymph nodes will thank you if you ever need them. Just put the backpack in the trunk and leave it there.

    As for home, you can go the canned food route, if you have the shelf space, or you can buy some plastic storage tubs and fill them with freeze dried food. In a pinch, you can dump cold water in it and let it sit. It won't be a warm meal, but it will be a meal. You can also get #10 cans of freeze dried food, but again, you'll need some space to store that.

    Consider a Water Bob. You can find it at cheaperthandirt.com. Takes up almost no space and will really come in handy.

    Another great resource, for ideas if not purchase, is campingsurvival.com.

    Like everyone else said, start small and add to it as you go.

    Andy
     
  13. dave

    dave Independence Member

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    I agree Andy. Preparation by definition (mine anyway) means tried and true.
    So practice bugging out if thats your thing. Make sure you are capable and actually have all of the things you need. Maybe you have too much. You wont know until youve tried it. Lots of folks talk about "headin fer the hills". Most have not really seriously roughed it. Sure some have. Almost all of us have lots of practice buggin in. Yet we still need to be versed in panic and stressful situations such as: no power, earthquake, no water/sewer. Loss of employment etc.

    That is the bag I was referring to. Thanks for the link
     
  14. g.i. joe

    g.i. joe Portland Active Member

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    Fortunately, my wife is full on with the program of gun toting, B.O.B in car, food storage, ammo storage, gun-a-month club, etc. You might have luck getting her to discuss world events that surround natural disaster. Currently Haiti (should be an easy one, cant change your underwear without being asked to give), If she understands these disasters can happen anywhere, wouldnt it be a good idea to prepare?
    Check out http://survivalblog.com James Wesly Rawles has some excellent resources and insight on this matter. Also, his book "Patriots, surviving the coming collapse" is a MUST read!
    Just keep packing things away, it wont be long till something happens and suddenly you will be her hero.
     
  15. wavo

    wavo Portland Member

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    +1 for Andy and Dave.

    I agree with the tried and true. When putting together your gear make sure it is good and make sure you know how to use it and it works.

    Recently I bought a small camp stove that comes with flammable cubes. It was so compact I wasn't sure how useful it would be. When i got the stove I picked up some Mountain House 'stew' and was curious if it was any good. A couple of weeks ago I decided to give everything a try. One cube for the stove is supposed to last 13 minutes and boil water after 8 minutes of burn time.

    I went out on a particularly windy night and my g/f and I tried to light the cube. To my surprise it lit on the 3rd match! I set it in the stove, put my water on and waited. The wind was really blowing hard and whipping the flame all over, after 8 minutes the cube burnt out. The water hadn't boiled but it was warm. It was good to test everything out before having to use it to survive, I will test again on a calmer day and with more shelter around the flame to see what kind of results I get. In addition I found out that I actually enjoyed the Mountain House 'stew' and there was loads of it, really enough for 2 people.

    Make sure you pack your BOB with things you will actually eat and enjoy eating, if you hate MRE's don't put them in there!

    Also +1 for the survival blog, some of it seems extreme on there but lots of good info.

    I'm handing out +1's like they are going out of style!
     
  16. Wenis

    Wenis Tri-Cities, WA Member

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    I would start with food, water and a small generator. You're more likely to lose water and electricity, and with a generator, you can preserve the food you already have.
     
  17. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    I seen that "water bob" on cheaper than dirt last week and got excited when I watched the video for it, the wife walked in mid video and says that is just ridiculous. I say what would you drink if the water stopped working. She replied with how would you fill it if the water stopped working. touché haha

    I tried to explain its for when you know something is going to happen or directly after something happens in hope the water is still working.
     
  18. Andy

    Andy Aurora, OR Active Member

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    For one, you still have water in your hot water heater. Of course if she would rather use a hose and bucket, that's her choice. :)

    Yes, this will not work if your pipes are broken, but it would come in handy in many situations. A small price to pay and a small package to store for a large return.
     
  19. jdub75

    jdub75 PNW Well-Known Member

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    That is the bag indeed from LAPolice gear. It is really nice-has just enough pockets & a sleeve in the inside for a hydration pack. The molle straps are great--I've got a canteen holder & canteen strapped on each pack, and another little pouch for the first aid kit. I wanted that easily seen & accessible, rather than having to go thru the different pockets of the bag looking for first aid.
    I picked up a can of that waterproofing spray & put 2 coats on that bag just for the heck of it. With the leftover spray, I hit a few of the families jackets & my beanies w/ it. In a true emergency, I may not be able to get to our rain coats.
     
  20. Andy

    Andy Aurora, OR Active Member

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    Just another quick note. Put a couple of the heavy duty trash bags in your pack. They can be used for lots of things - backpack cover, rain jacket, etc. It might come in handy if someone with you is not prepared. And again, it takes up very little space.