Messages
473
Reactions
714
Recently I was given a 30-30 that I was told needed "a little TLC". When I removed it from the gun case, I was astounded to see how much it had been disrespected over the years (see attached pics).

IMG_20190214_071409485.jpg IMG_20190214_050527846.jpg

This is a post-64 manufactured in 1972 (according to the S/N). There are a few mising pieces, obviously the fore and butt stock and the hammer spring and guide rod. I dismantled it completely (with progress pictures and laid out carefully) to determine what needed to be done. The bore seems to be fairly clean with no pitting, but a lot of old dust and grime (i've run a swap through it). Everything else seemed to be in dirty, but workable condition.

Here's what I found; trigger was broken and have replacement, spring cover (have replacement), rear sight (have replacement), replace all screws, replace front sight and hood, replace fore and butt stock, new hammer spring and guide rod, and re-blue EVERYTHING (rust-blue based on 1972 date-of-manufacture).

Question for you folks is do you think I have missed anything obvious? Any advice, other than drop it and run? I know It will be virtually impossible to restore it to original condition, due to being disrepected so badly, but I'd like to restore it at least to working condition. After all, it's a 30-30, right? Any self-respecting westerner, would not throw away a 30-30!

Any thoughts or advice appreciated. Thank you!
 
Messages
12,983
Reactions
23,140
Well you can drop it my way and run but if you did you wouldn't recognize it in a month or so!
I say hit eBay up for the remaining parts & a nice, origional stock set, clean & sand the metal parts and give them a cold bluing job (when done properly with proper prep & preheating can come out quite well)
Stone dress all the exposed screws (if needed) and give them an oil blackening.
Bottom line is this is an easy 'back to shooter grade' restore with minimal cost and effort.
 
Last Edited:
Messages
473
Reactions
714
Well you can drop it my way and run but if you did you wouldn't recognize it in a month or so!
I say hit eBay up for the remaining parts & a nice, origional stock set, clean & sand the metal parts and give them a cold bluing job (when done properly with proper prep & preheating can come out quite well)
Stone dress all the exposed screws (if needed) and give them an oil blackening.
Bottom line is this is an easy 'back to shooter grade' restore with minimal cost and effort.

I have been reading that you can't Cold Blue a post-64 Winchester since they likely used a different type of metal that would just turn the finish delighful purple. In talking to Brownell's this morning, they suggested using Pilkington Rust Blue for this barrel. That seems to be a drawn out process (not that I'm afraid of a little elbow grease), but in reality leaves one of the best bluing finishes you can get. Maybe I'm misunderstanding how easy it might be, but my "should be easy" estimates are normally off-kilter.
 

NWCustomFirearms

Messages
1,225
Reactions
1,716
If you want to shoot me a message we can talk about it. I would not use cold blue to refinish a full gun. I have seen it done many many times and whole I have seen one or two turn out ok the rest do not. Plus it is not a very durable finish. Sometimes we can hot blue the 94's and if that does not work we can always cerakote it just to protect it. Not the best looking finish on a 94 but it beats bare rusty metal ;)
 
Messages
473
Reactions
714
If you want to shoot me a message we can talk about it. I would not use cold blue to refinish a full gun. I have seen it done many many times and whole I have seen one or two turn out ok the rest do not. Plus it is not a very durable finish. Sometimes we can hot blue the 94's and if that does not work we can always cerakote it just to protect it. Not the best looking finish on a 94 but it beats bare rusty metal ;)

PM sent.
 

thorborg

Messages
2,583
Reactions
5,999
I've had both, Pre and post.
Post, definitely aint no pre, not even close in my opine.
But beyond weight, material and other quality issues lacking of the post, they both shot 30-30's and were fun to shoot.
I personally wouldn't invest much on others to rebuild it, but as a fun DYI hobby in rebuilding, a post is a better choice than a pre to earn your merit badge on and will give you wonderful insight towards the fruit or foolishness of future projects you come across.
 

jbett98

Messages
12,057
Reactions
23,137
If you want to re-blue it yourself, then take a look at a product called Laurel Mountain Forge.
I've had good results with it as it's very user friendly, but a lot of repetition in the steps until you get the desired color.
The muzzle loader guys use this product for that plummy brown rust color, but if you soak the parts in boiling distilled water after letting them rust, you can achieve a cool dark grey military like the vintage WW2 German guns.




https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjn2c-Msr7gAhV8JzQIHSRIC_0QFjABegQIBRAB&url=http://www.laurelmountainforge.com/barrel_brown.htm&usg=AOvVaw05eNexbGs_8D9xKmPiQnmQ
 
Last Edited:
Messages
473
Reactions
714
If you want to re-blue it yourself, then take a look at a product called Laurel Mountain Forge.
I've had good results with it as it's very used friendly, but a lot of repetition in the steps until you get the desired color.
The muzzle loader guys use this for that plummy brown rust color, but if you soak the parts in boiling distilled water after letting them rust, you can achieve a cool dark grey military like the vintage WW2 German guns.




https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjn2c-Msr7gAhV8JzQIHSRIC_0QFjABegQIBRAB&url=http://www.laurelmountainforge.com/barrel_brown.htm&usg=AOvVaw05eNexbGs_8D9xKmPiQnmQ

I wish the web site had some examples of completed projects. Poor marketing! :)
 
Messages
1,220
Reactions
1,837
Well you can drop it my way and run but if you did you wouldn't recognize it in a month or so!
I say hit eBay up for the remaining parts & a nice, origional stock set, clean & sand the metal parts and give them a cold bluing job (when done properly with proper prep & preheating can come out quite well)
Stone dress all the exposed screws (if needed) and give them an oil blackening.
Bottom line is this is an easy 'back to shooter grade' restore with minimal cost and effort.

Not possible. In great shape this is a $350-400 gun tops. Even if you counted you labor as free, you’ll have more money tied up in it than it’s ever worth. What you describe is just lipstick on a pig, and doesn’t address pitting or rust damage. At best this is a parts gun.
 
Damn the torpedoes, make it YOUR Shooter and then beat the hell out of it. Truck gun?
If you like bluing (purdy) blue it. If you like greater beater durability, cerakote it. It was free, have fun.

I gather your picture is after cleanup of the internals. Your '72 sounds like a virgin compared to how my pre '59 was (though no external rust or pitting). Mine looked like it was a mud wrestler that never showered.

[edit to add] Love my '94, more than my 336. At the BP range at TCGC, guy says to me, "no self respecting 30-30 shooter would get one that side ejects."
 
Messages
1,220
Reactions
1,837
So once you buy a stock/forearm set, cerecoat it, and replace parts, you could have bought an original, in good shape, and not have this embarrassment in your safe. You have to know the difference between a project and a lost cause. No point in throwing money away. Make it a wall hanger and buy something you’d be proud to own.
 
Messages
11,085
Reactions
50,436
So once you buy a stock/forearm set, cerecoat it, and replace parts, you could have bought an original, in good shape, and not have this embarrassment in your safe. You have to know the difference between a project and a lost cause. No point in throwing money away. Make it a wall hanger and buy something you’d be proud to own.

I would be proud to own that and don't think it is an embarrassment in the least. Some people like working on old guns and IMHO they should be saved and honored!
 
Messages
473
Reactions
714
I really never thought about it until later in life, but a good friendship is to be cherished. Much of my career was spent climbing the ladder and leaving friends behind in my moves around the country. Now I realize that spending time with someone who was raised differently than I was (and is still as nice as I am) ;) and sharing experiences and hobbies is worthwhile.

This rifle was given to me by a good friend, where I have very few of those. That means more to me than just a piece of steel. :D
 

Upcoming Events

Rimfire Challenge
Canby, OR
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Chehalis, WA

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Back Top