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Any of You Recycle?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by safetyman, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. safetyman

    safetyman Clark County, WA Active Member

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    I've been wondering just how many members here make a conscious effort to recycle household wastes. So, do you? I always try to recycle when I can: glass, plastic, cardboard, whatever has that triangle logo indicating it is recyclable. I even pack stuff home when I'm out and about just so I can throw it in the recycle bin.

    Most of the time we barely have a full bag of actual refuse for the waste guys to pick up, and most of that is cooking waste (i.e. plant scraps, eggshells, paper towels, etc.). I am currently working on a plan to incorporate a compost bin to further reduce my waste that ends up in the landfill.

    I am interested in any and all ideas I can employ to take further steps toward reducing my trash :).
     
  2. Trailboss

    Trailboss Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I recycle all my empty cases into live ammo using an RCBS Rockchucker. It saves thousands of brass cases from going to the landfill each year. I also recycle blocks of plumbers lead, turning it into bullets that I reload.

    I also recycle my empty cardboard boxes into targets and afterwards, I recycle the shot up cardboard into firestarter paper.
     
    Bunny, Wifey, ZA_Survivalist and 5 others like this.
  3. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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    If you garden at all, composting is your friend! Pretty much anything non-meat can go in, and coffee grounds and egg shells are especially good as nutrients. Lots of info on the web and you don't have to spend any money at all if you make a crude bin or two out of scraps (no pun intended).
     
  4. safetyman

    safetyman Clark County, WA Active Member

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    What a great post. reloading is something I should've expected (but completely ignored) when I posted.
     
  5. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

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    I've been recycling long before it was fashionable. Beyond your municipal sponsored recycling, I also re-use stuff that most people either throw away and throw in the recycle bin. Bags from bread get saved and re-used. Same foe those little platic tubs from cottage cheese (great for paint).
     
  6. safetyman

    safetyman Clark County, WA Active Member

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    I also reuse bread bags and the thin produce bags from the grocery store...they are great for picking up doggy doo doo.
     
  7. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Scrap metal and oil are about the only two things I recycle. I talked to someone in the recycle business some time ago and he filled me in on the realities of it. Other than that If it burns it goes in the shop stove, otherwise bagged and into the trash trailer for a trip to the transfer station when full.
     
  8. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Depending on your local landfill setup, it may actually be beneficial to leave scrap food in the trash. At the landfill here they use the methane generated by the decomposition of organic matter in the buried refuse to generate power for the disposal center, as well as surplus for the city.
     
  9. PDXSparky

    PDXSparky Keizer / Hillsboro Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a super recycler, but if I can put it in one of the 3 recycle containers that my service collects, it gets recycled. For food, if it can go in the disposal, then that's where it goes.
     
  10. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

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    We generally recycle all plastic bottles/containers, glass bottles, cans, newspaper, most paper and cardboard. Still not recycling all of our kitchen scraps - more random as to when I remember to take something out to the yard wast can. Typically do this if it's something large (pineapple core, corn cobs, etc.). We can stick greasy pizza boxes into our yard waste, which is nice.
     
  11. FourTeeFive

    FourTeeFive PNW Washington State Active Member

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    Seems to be community dependent based on how easy the local waste collection makes it. I'm always amazed going around the country how little recycling takes place in some areas compared to the Northwest.
     
  12. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Also another thing related to food scraps, some collectors allow you to put scraps in the "yard debris" bin (if you have one).
     
  13. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My grandmother was recycling clothing, Tin cans, Newspapers in the 50's 60's 70's 80's 90's until her death.

    My Grandfather was a house painter back in the paint brush and oil paint days. He even had a 4 stage cleaning solution for his brushes that allowed the particulates to fall out of the paint thinner so he could reuse it. The last wash was always new thinner to keep the brushes super clean but before that all used thinner.

    My grandfather had a large flat baking pan all pulled nails went into and when a small job required a nail he went to the pan and pulled out what he needed straightened them and reused them. I do the same thing with wood screws using them to hold a joint while it glues then removing them filling the holes with wood plugs and reusing the screws.

    My dad was the same way many times bringing home materials removed from buildings they worked on and repurposed at home.

    We have put over 2500.00 into our grand daughters future fund (college or bail who can tell at ages 4 and 5) by recycling all our pop and beer cans and water bottles now.

    We have never bought a new car always buying something used and then taking care of it. Last two cars the wife has had were a 1967 Mustang I changed the tranny in and did some work to that raised it from 19mpg to 26mpg. She drove that car for almost 100K then I drove it to work for two summers. We sold it for what we paid for it to someone who was going to completely restore it for their daughter to drive to college. I'm quite sure that car had well over 600K on it. In its life time based on the average of replacing a car every 7 years that Mustang replaced the need for 6 new cars being built. And the Mustang is still on the road.

    Her next car was a 97 Saturn Sport Coupe we bought with about 69K on the clock she drove it for over 200K before we traded it in maintained in a condition that it was still going 85 miles a day round trip to work at 32-33mpg. I did all the work on it as well.

    In 1991 I bought a 1966 Ford F250 drove it for 4 years. Then replaced the engine from a 1974 F250 that I parted out helping to get 6 other peoples trucks fixed with the parts. The 66 F250 then carried on until 2003 when it was sold to a young guy as his first pickup (I see it running around town every once and a while) I replaced it with a EX State of Oregon pickup a Dodge Dakota I plan on using for another 100K its got 140K on the clock now. And I might just rebuild the engine then. Depending on how the rest of the truck is holding up.

    The 66 F-250 has also replaced another 6 vehicles that did not have to be built to take its place.

    I been reloading almost all ammo I shoot since 1968 (I was 11 when I started)

    I collect LPs so almost all my 2600 albums have been bought used. RECYCLING
    I buy used firearms I buy used tools I buy used model airplane engines.

    I have a huge inventory of building materials I will repurpose.

    all of our vegitable food waste goes into the compost pile to grow tomatoes and pumpkins in. All our cardboard paper metal kitchen waste goes in a comingle recycling bin. Glass into its own bin.

    I once bought a pickup truck load of solid wood flooring that had been pulled up out of some rich guys billard room. It took me 3 weekends to pull all the nails and sort and stack it. It waited 2 years on our front porch (covered) until our son left for the navy and then I spent almost 3 weeks carefully leveling the upstairs bedroom floor and then I reinstalled the Brazilian Cherry wood floor drilling each nail hole and gluing each piece to the one next to it. The results is a 11" X 13" library floor that would have cost over $15.00 per sq ft to have new installed that I had less then 200.00 into including the sanding belts and water based finish.

    We wanted a claw foot bathtub for our downstairs bath (1920's house 1920's style bathroom) so we hunted one up out of a barn and I spent a week grinding all the dozens of coats of paint off it sandblasting it and then coating it with POR15 and primer so it could be painted to match the walls.

    yea we recycle repurpose reuse buy used fix and maintain restore and hold on to everything we can.

    But then we are Republicans we work for every dime we have so we tend to be conservative. Shes a grociery store bookkeeper and I drive construction dump truck for a paving company.
     
  14. spectra

    spectra The Couve Moderator Staff Member Bronze Supporter

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    I try to recycle anything I can. Only problem I have is people keep stealing my Glass recycling bin with all my beer bottles in it:laugh: I buy then in WA but they still are worth a nickel in OR and I guess that causes people to be interested in them. One day I am going to wait out in the driveway and scare the living you know what out of them.
     
  15. safetyman

    safetyman Clark County, WA Active Member

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    I donate my bottles to a girl in high school down the street who does just that. She has a couple other houses in the neighborhood save their bottles for her also...I bet she has saved up a bunch so far!
     
  16. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

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    Being that I live far enough in the sticks that weekly trash service costs a bunch we usually make a dump run every month or so instead. In order to extend the time between dump runs I can drop metal, cardboard, newspaper, and plastic off at the city recycling center in town. This time of year the burn barrel gets a workout as well - more for brush and tree trimmings than trash but those pesky pizza boxes and mail that needs shredding get burned. Much quicker than feeding it through the shredder and a good way to start the barrel burning well. The only thing I haven't figured out is why the city doesn't take glass for recycling - I wonder if the glass bottle factory near the port takes used glass - that might extend the time between dump runs a bit further.
     
  17. spectra

    spectra The Couve Moderator Staff Member Bronze Supporter

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    I used to give them to my in laws neighbor but I got tired of collecting stuff:laugh: Not like I hoard s**t as it is. Not sure where you are at but if you are on the east side I could add to her collection;) Let me know:thumbup:
     
  18. bentbronco

    bentbronco pdx New Member

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    I grew up in a family print shop, back in the day when we got paid a few pennies a pound for our paper scraps. Now unemployed I have time on my hands to do more. Being in the city and having weekly pick up of recyclables makes it easy. I try to stay busy rebuilding my family's cars and trucks to helping the parents with siding and house upkeep.
    My dad has been shredding a bunch of old docs from the print shop. He uses those shredding to start campfires. I can think of a more secure way of taking care of business.
     
  19. Kelzebubba

    Kelzebubba Fort Worth, TX/USA Public Outhouse Active Member

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    I can tell you one bad thing to recycle... condoms. I was told you could turn them inside out and shake the **** out of them, and now I have two little ones running around. So be careful, recycling sometimes isn't always that great of an idea.
     
  20. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    ""I try to recycle anything I can. Only problem I have is people keep stealing my Glass recycling bin with all my beer bottles in it I buy then in WA but they still are worth a nickel in OR and I guess that causes people to be interested in them. One day I am going to wait out in the driveway and scare the living you know what out of them.""


    ""I donate my bottles to a girl in high school down the street who does just that. She has a couple other houses in the neighborhood save their bottles for her also...I bet she has saved up a bunch so far!""



    That's not just recycling, it's larceny! None of those bottles/cans puchased in Washington had a deposit paid on them. People bringing those containers to Oregon turning them in for money are thieves, every bit as much as if they'd put their hand in a till and taken the money.

    Mike