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Any good books or links for gun theory?

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by michaels, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    I'm looking to deepen my understanding on how guns are put together, function, etc..

    I keep finding either books on ballistics (too detailed for me)

    Or websites on homemade guns, zip guns, piece of pipe and a firing pin (not nearly detailed enough)

    Something nice and in between. What are your resources, book wise or website wise?

    Ideally, if there was something like this : http://www.pdnotebook.com/wp-conten.../Five_hundred_and_seven_mechanical_moveme.pdf

    but just for guns that would be cool. If you know any good (or even not good) resources, please post.

    Thanks!
     
  2. netcarrier

    netcarrier Portland, Oregon Active Member

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    Hi Michaels,
    Here a place you can get DVDs on Weapons; From Disassembly and Reassembly, to how they work Design, Function and Repair, Proper Cleaning and Lubrication, Gunsmithing Tricks, and Trouble Shooting & Repair.
    It is AGI "American Gunsmithing Institute". You can join a Club call "The Gun Club of America". They have Armorer Courses and Gunsmithing Courses.
    If you would like to watch one of the DVDs PM me. You can come over and watch it.
    Hope this helps,
    Tony Portland, Oregon Area
     
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  3. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    Thanks Tony
     
  4. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    A basic primer on machining practices and theory may be of some help also.
    Especially when clearances, finish grades etc. are considered.
     
  5. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    If you can find access to a cut-away guns, that would be a good start. When in gunsmithing school, we were given an assignment called cycle of operations. We were assigned to look at a S&W Model 10 revolver, a Mauser bolt action, and a 1911 pistol. The assignment was to write down every movement that the gun made during a standard cycle of operations. It forces you to examine every movement. Sears, disconnector, barrel, bolt, cylinder, etc. It was the single best thing I ever did in school to help learn how guns worked.

    Incidentally, there were well over 300 separate movements in a S&W revolver to open the cylinder, put in two rounds, fire two rounds, one single, one double action, open the cylinder and eject the spent cases.
     
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  6. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    Thanks Jamie.

    Mountain Bear, are the youtube animations usually pretty accurate?

    Just because I don't have access to cutaway guns.

    I like the exercise you were made to do.

    I'm sure you got a lot from that.