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Another cow killed by the Imnaha wolf pack

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by pokerace, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. pokerace

    pokerace Newberg Well-Known Member

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    LA GRANDE, Ore.—ODFW confirmed that another cow was killed by wolves from the Imnaha pack over the weekend. The yearling heifer was found dead on private land in Wallowa County.
    This brings the total number of confirmed livestock losses by Imnaha pack wolves to 19 since spring 2010. It is the fifth confirmed livestock loss to wolves since an Oct. 5, 2011 court-ordered stay ended ODFW plans to kill two wolves from the Imnaha pack in an attempt to stop further livestock losses.

    While the pack is continuing a pattern of chronic livestock depredation begun in spring 2010, ODFW wolf coordinator Russ Morgan characterizes the recent kills as a “significant” change in the pack’s behavior. Previously the pack killed mostly smaller calves, but now it has shifted to larger-sized yearling and adult cows. The timing is also new, as depredation by this pack has not been previously confirmed during the period October through December.
    “The latest incident reaffirms that the pack is in a pattern of chronic depredation, which we expect to continue,” said Morgan. “While we believe the appropriate response is lethal removal of these problem wolves under the chronic depredation rule, that option is off the table due to litigation.”

    The wolves targeted the ranch twice over two days. The cattle involved had recently been gathered and placed into a holding pasture near the main ranch house, as they were scheduled to be hauled on Monday. On Sunday morning, the landowner discovered that the cattle had been run through the fence and the yearling heifer was found dead a half mile away. The cattle were returned to the pasture, only to be scattered again by Monday morning. GPS radio-collar data shows that the alpha male of the Imnaha wolf pack was present at the site of the depredation and was also in the area when the cows were scattered the next day. Other wolves from the pack were likely with the alpha male, but their VHF radio-collars don’t allow such close location tracking.

    The alpha male wolf was in remote country about five miles from the pasture the evening before the Sunday morning attack, yet by 2 a.m. he was only about 300 yards from the main ranch house, on the way to the pasture with cattle.
    This rancher had taken a variety of non-lethal measures on different areas of his large ranch over the past two years. He had installed barrier fences with fladry (flagged fencing that can deter wolves) on parts of his ranch and has used a radio-activated guard device that makes noise when a radio-collared wolf approaches. The rancher had also increased monitoring of his livestock and has used a radio receiver to detect when a collared wolf was nearby.

    “This is a good example of a situation where the landowner had done everything right,” said Morgan. “I don’t think there are other measures that could have been reasonably taken in this case, so it is a very frustrating situation for livestock producers and wildlife managers.”
    ODFW continues to work with area landowners on non-lethal ways to avoid wolf-livestock problems. For example, ODFW sends twice-daily text messages about wolves’ locations to area livestock producers. A range rider funded by ODFW and Defenders of Wildlife has monitored the wolves’ location in relation to livestock.

    Besides non-lethal measures, ODFW has also provided some ranchers with permits to kill a wolf they catch “in the act of biting, wounding or killing” livestock or with permits that allow them to haze wolves. The chance to use these permits is rare because wolves typically avoid people and usually attack livestock at night. None of these permits issued by ODFW has ever been used, again because it is very rare for a person to actually be present when a wolf is “in the act” of attacking livestock.

    This landowner and others that have lost livestock animals to wolves are likely to be compensated for their losses. Earlier this year, the Oregon State Legislature and Governor Kitzhaber directed the Oregon Department of Agriculture to create a wolf compensation program. The program is expected to be in effect in early 2012. Ranchers that lost livestock since early September 2011 (when a compensation program funded by Defenders of Wildlife ended) will be eligible for retroactive compensation.

    Summaries of the wolf investigations and confirmations can be found on ODFW’s livestock loss investigations page.

    More information on wolves in Oregon.
     
  2. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    Time to eliminate some worthless wolves.
     
  3. pokerace

    pokerace Newberg Well-Known Member

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    agree but did you see this line in the story.

    Oct. 5, 2011 court-ordered stay ended ODFW plans to kill two wolves from the Imnaha pack
     
  4. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    Yup. Sounds like those ranchers (who are losing cattle) need to take matters into their own hands and give those wolves a hot lead enema. Court-orders don't mean much to me.
     
  5. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that the ranchers reported the kills in the first place. They probably thought the government would re-imburse them and then maybe even do something about the wolves. However, the government will never do anything and now the farmers/ranchers are going to be under scrutiny if any wolves go missing.

    This should be a good lesson to other farmers or ranchers that have a wolf problem.

    SSS
     
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  6. revjen45

    revjen45 Snohomish County Well-Known Member

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    Musings from an uninvolved party - wouldn't a gut shot from a .22 send the predator packing, to die elsewhere? Of course I'm not advocating any illegal actions, just thinking out loud.
     
  7. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    Not nearly as well as a gutshot from a .270 or .30-06...
     
  8. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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    Wounding any animal on purpose is sinful.
     
  9. pokerace

    pokerace Newberg Well-Known Member

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    I hate it when people bring religion in to a subject. Therefore I have deleted my original post where I expressed my opinion.
     
  10. cyclesarge

    cyclesarge Eugene OR, DUH! We're ALL in the NORTHWEST Well-Known Member

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    My favorite line was "ODFW continues to work with area landowners on non-lethal ways to avoid wolf-livestock problems. For example, ODFW sends twice-daily text messages about wolves’ locations to area livestock producers." 'cause everyone knows how well wolves responds to wireless communication technology.:laugh:
    Seriously though, a wolf can cover a LOT of ground as shown in the article, I can see the text arriving right about the same time the wolves run off with full bellies.
     
  11. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

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    It's a sin to pay politicians to destroy family businesses, this is a nationwide problem with the 4 footed wolves being the honest ones
    SSS
     
  12. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    Oh no! I'm a 'sinner'?! bubblegum...whatever shall I do?!

    I stopped believing in fairy tales a long time ago.
     
  13. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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    You don't have to believe in fairy tales; I believe a "Sin" can be a despicable act that diminishes one as a person and all of us as a member of his tribe.
    Upon shooting an Elephant in Africa a companion of John Huston said: "that's a crime" John replied "no, that is a SIN".] A stronger word meaning Not illegal but just plain Wrong.
     
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  14. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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    This.

    FWIW, Redcap, in my earlier post, I could not come up with a secular reference so low as to express what a man that purposely wounds animals is; hence, I used the quasi religious bent.
     
  15. rufus

    rufus State of Jefferson Well-Known Member

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    That's what backhoes are for.
     
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  16. MinnesotaORnewbie

    MinnesotaORnewbie Oregon Active Member

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    ranchers in most states do get compensated, and they also benefit from multiple federal programs which include use of federal and state land bordering their own for grazing rights and very cheap land leases and even purchases of large tracts of land that maybe of use only to a rancher. The value of their land they have accumalated has made them alot of money, that is why they work with the feds on the wolfs. They may not like wolfs, but any smart business owner knows you dont hit the hand that has and still is giving them numerous oppurtunities to live and grow their ranch into a very profitable business.
     
  17. MinnesotaORnewbie

    MinnesotaORnewbie Oregon Active Member

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    Redcap> lol, you are alot of words but no one has to even say them because you constantly show everyone on this forum who and just what you are.
     
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  18. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    Hence the SSS. Farmers will take the money they can get and not report the wolves. But the wolves will disappear. Only an idiot would report the wolves. The government just wants the Ranchers to vacate the land.
     
  19. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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    That's a little rich. If the feds wanted them to vacate the land they wouldn't give them all kinds of breaks on grazing, plus other subsidies. If the ranchers had to compete in a free market economy they'd go bust pretty fast.
     
  20. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    Time will tell. The perspective will also very depending on the agency. Many of those grazing rights and subsidies have been around for a long time. I haven't heard of them being expanded lately.