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AGI ( American Gunsmithing Institute )

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by terrylf72, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    Im considering ordering AGI's Master Gunsmithing Course. Does anyone have any opinions? I have read the stories from others and messages a couple of smiths that are listed that have gone through the course.. Im looking for some objective people that are outside the schooling..

    Thanks

    Terry
     
  2. RED DAWN

    RED DAWN McMinnville ish New Member

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    I have seen some of their videos, (AR-ak-fn fal) and they seem to be squared away.
     
  3. netcarrier

    netcarrier Portland, Oregon Active Member

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    Hi Terrylf72,
    I think that this is one of the best School in the USA. These DVD's are good tools you can watch over and over till you get the information you need to do the work on the weapons. You not only see how to Disassembly and Reassembly but you learn how the Weapon operate. "Design, Function and Repair"

    I have many of the Armorer's Courses; Building the Ultimate 1911, Building the Custom Glock, and have the Certified Law Enforement Armorer's. If you would like to stop by take a look at some of the DVD's give a PM so we can set up a time you can come over andcheck it out for youself.

    Hope this may help,
    Tony Portland, Oregon Area
    Certified Armorer
     
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  4. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    As long as you take the courses for what they are, you'll do fine with them. You won't be a "master gunsmith" when you finsih with them. Chances are, if they fit your learning style well, you may be ready to apprentice for someone with a good amount of experience. Best advice I can give having gone through a gunsmithing school is don't be too eager to start your own thing when you finish. Learn from someone who has been in the business awhile. That way you'll be able to ask the questions that you couldn't ask your tv screen watching the dvd's...
     
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  5. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    There are some tip and tricks that the video's don't cover from some of the master 'smiths in the trade.

    I agree with the above, go ahead and watch the videos...but apprentice under someone to get the full picture.
     
  6. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    Thanks to all who has responded.. I know that when it comes down to it.. you get out of it what you put into it.. But i know that i learn better from listening and watching and seeing exactly where or what they are looking and pointing at. As for the hole " Master Gunsmithing Course ".. The more info and instruction you get from others in the field with experience is always better and you never stop learning. I am a machinist in my job ( lathe, multi-axis, milling, drilling) so I have a heads on there.. and have done welding before just not certified..



    Netcarrier (tony)..
    Thanks for the info.. Sounds great, I would like that a lot.. to talk to someone who has either taken or is taking the course and to see what I would be getting.

    Mountainbear..
    I have been looking into this program for about 6 months now.. as for the Master Course, it has built into the learning process a Machinist, welding, custom building of firearms and the Armorer's Courses too.. not just the Design, Function and Repair aspect..

    Wichaka...
    like you have said, although AGI says you can run on your own, i think for me i would be more comfortable working under someone to get the " hole " picture.. I have followed a lot of your info in the past. Reading your informative responses was like reading my dads instructions on things. LOL..
     
  7. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I spoke to a well-known Oregon gunsmith/firearms expert a couple years ago with the same question. We talked extensively about it and he questioned my background which includes a lifetime of gun ownership, welding and metal fabrication (I used to have a shop) 'novice' machining skills and many years of hobby gunsmithing including modifications, light tuning and accuracy work and hand making parts for old, obsolete guns. His reason for the interrogation was because while he firmly believed AGI is a great avenue for someone who already has a solid, mechanically inclined background coupled with some intermediate gun tinkering skills, he wanted to make it clear AGI was definitely not for the beginner, and not particularly oriented for someone without mechanical skills. With the 'Additional' time I now have I will probably be starting the course myself this fall - heck I am even setting up my 'classroom' in an additional shop on my property dedicated to it.
     
  8. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    first of all "armorers" certified or not are bs, minimal training. DVD's are bs. The only real school I know of is The Colorado School Of Trades. It isn't cheap, but if you want to be a real professional gunsmith it is the best.

    The only apprentice gunsmiths I know of did it in germany.
     
  9. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    No doubt a true statement but not everyone can create the opportunity to attend it. I already do cleanings & light repairs for friends, acquaintances & customers I meet at work and want to do something to expand my knowledge and understanding of a wider variety of guns and AGI is about my only recourse at this point.
     
  10. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    The DVD's will help. But the best is hands on!

    There is not a school or DVD that will teach you everything. The best is to start small and work your way up! Get your FFL and move forward, maybe find a small shop to do repairs for...
     
  11. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I think much of it has to do with your ability to recognize a problem, disassemble the device and it's components, identify how the individual parts interact with one another, determine the problem and carefully decide on a course of action to resolve the problem without destroying the original device or creating another problem. Guns are not particularly high tech devices nor do they have a lot of moving parts. They do though need to have those parts work and fit correctly to operate safely and consistently. If one already has these skills then learning gunsmithing techniques will be much easier, especially if this person is already familiar with a variety of guns and their construction and operation. I believe Mechanical Inclination, in it's most basic sense, is something one is born with and cannot be taught. You either have it or you do not and gunsmithing, basic to advanced, requires a high degree of it.
     
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  12. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    You are 100% correct! If you lack in that department your not going it make a good smith.
     
  13. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    But you might be able to build a 'Punt Gun' out of a section of 2" black steel pipe and a threaded cap.
     
  14. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    Hehe and then sell it for a huge amount of money! And do it on national tv!!
     
  15. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    There's a few schools around that will help with gunsmithing. The most local is Lassen Comm. College in Susanville CA. They offer full time and summer 1-2 week NRA sponsored classes that are very reasonably priced, and get one going in the right direction.
     
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  16. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    There are several decent schools. Like Wichaka mentioned Lassen CC in Susanville is the closest, and I have known some decent gunsmiths who have gone there, but I never recommend anyone live in California. Both Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad Jr. College in southern Colorado are also good. None of them will be cheap.

    As for apprenticing: it might not be an actual apprenticeship program, but many of the gunsmiths I know went to work for more experienced gunsmiths after they went through a school. Schools are great, they give you the basics (some better than others), but having someone around to ask questions and teach you is always the best option.

    The "best" school title is something that is hotly debated amongst graduates of the different programs. I graduated from Colorado School of Trades. I am happy I went there, but honestly do not know if they are the best right now. If I were looking, I would seriously consider Trinidad as well...
     
  17. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    Yavapai college in AZ is another good 'smithing school.
     
  18. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six North Greenlake, Seattle New Member

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    Gunsmithing it one of the things one should learn from a teacher, in person.
     
  19. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    Technically you are learning from a teacher, he is just on video. As for having question for what you are working on, you can call, email or live chat. I did get to see a few videos and found that they were better and more detailed and informative then i was expecting. Being able to rewind and rewatch an area of the video was very helpful.. , although having a teacher looking over your shoulder is invaluable, i just cant leave work for 2 years. And those i have talked to that have taken the AGI course have been very infomative, about what they thought of the course before and after taking it.. Have alleviate a lot of my fears about the course being a " go no where cource"


    Think im going to do it..
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2012
  20. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six North Greenlake, Seattle New Member

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    I'm one of those guys. I ended up learning from a teacher, in person.

    If you buy the course, you'll see.