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A interesting opinion on bugout vehicles

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by coastal steelheader, Dec 27, 2014.

  1. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting, his choice for a good bugout video is going to rile a few people for sure

     
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  2. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    Thats why I enjoy the idea of scout vehicles/rifles.. If Im moving its to get somewhere fast...not to live in a brand new unfamiliar environment (bugging out)..

    That and its laughable to see folks seriously picture themselves packing ALL their gear and just waltzing out onto the freeway.. Yep.. Ill be fed for months with mentalities like that.. Nothing to stop bandits from halting forward progression and robbing/murdering the entire convoy.

    Shoot and scoot firearms and vehicles are the way to go IMO.
    ;)
     
  3. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    :D Kinda figured on looting the looters. They will be the real cash cows. Plus nobody would say a thing if you send a looter on his way, anyone with a gun would help too.:D
     
  4. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    image.jpg I actually have a bug out vehicle, I don't have pics of it handy. I also have a Bug In vehical. I do have a pic of it
     
  5. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    Now that is an interesting bike.:D
     
  6. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    Oldschool
    old-military-motorcycle-german-oldtimer-machine-gun-32852249.jpg
     
  7. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Pretty much the way you will move around, if you choose to move around.
     
  8. Provincial

    Provincial Near Salem, OR Well-Known Member

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    The side car may not fit through some places. It would be nice to have one that quickly detached and hooked back up again after clearing the narrow spot.
     
  9. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    You mean like mine does? Brake line has quick detach, would require removing two bolts.

    The hack is not ideal for all things, but it gives you the ability to transport quite a bit and get around locally a lot better than if you where in a car or truck. It has the added benefit of being a lot of fun.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
  10. YoungBlood

    YoungBlood SW Washington Active Member

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    Once that sidecar is detached how easy is it to move around to get through a narrow piece and then hook back up? Especially once its loaded with gear that one would probly not want to unload/repack.
     
  11. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    nutnfancy bugs me too much.I haven't watched any of his vids for over a year.I tend not to watch the guys who film themselves more than the topic at hand.
    I would love a Ural 2wd bike and sidecar. I would want it more if top speed and hp was more than 45 lol
    So Iron Master,what is that bike?
     
  12. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    Its a 09 Kawasaki Versys with a Dauntless enduro hack. Dauntless builds sidecars in Enumclaw right up the road from me and I let them use one of my machines occasionally so they made me a good deal on it. Its pretty low buck compared to a Ural and it still does 90 MPH.

    Ive got about 8 grand in it and I bought the bike new (bought it in 2011 as a still on the showroom floor 09 for 5 grand plus tax) I painted it myself with some army green, it was neon green from the factory.

    The cheapie Urals start around $14K and are not near as reliable as a Kawasaki twin. The motor in this is the same motor that is in both the KLR 650 and the Ninja 650 so there are a lot of bikes running around for parts. This would not be fun for a person to tag along in long distance though. Its intended for cargo and canine transport. Really there is not even seat in the hack, it does have a ammo can bolted to the floor in the back that you can sit on, it has a couple of fuel cans attached behind that. Honestly its pretty brutal to ride long distance.

    I always figured that it would be easier out on the freeway and harder around town than a regular bike, That's exactly opposite of how it actually is. Around town its great, easy with most of the benefits of a bike. Out of the freeway at 70 MPH it is a battle. It would be better with a leading link front end but that is a couple grand I really dont want to spend. I dont ride it nearly enough and its a pain to store compared to the dual sports Ive had in the past. But I have a dog that goes everywhere I go and she loves to ride. I love taking her too. It doesn't matter if its a 90 year old or a 9 year old they all smile when they see the dog in the sidecar.

    I have had dreams of doing some long distance runs (couple thousand miles?) Taking a month and just driving around the US, sleeping next to this thing. Maybe someday I'll actually do it.
     
  13. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    I am not a fan of Nutnfancy either, Mostly because he usually takes 40 minutes to tell you 5 minutes worth of information.
     
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  14. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    For the guys who pick bikes, what about nutunfancys point about exposure? I'm not bashing your pick but he does have a valid point.
     
  15. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    I think the question would be pick bikes for what? If I was going to "bug out" (I hate that word, really what I would be doing is simply leaving) I would be doing it in my Ford F-250 towing a trailer. The Bike might very well be in the back of the truck as a secondary vehicle. In my case the bike would be for local work. Getting around, gathering stuff up and moving people short distances. I think for that it would be hard to beat.

    Really though if things did fall apart I think the best thing you could do is have as many options covered as possible. I have a big 4X diesel pickup, I also have a little econo box car and a Toyota pickup and two motorcycles, one with the sidecar. After you know what your up against you figure out whats best.
     
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  16. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    If the roads are usable it really doesnt matter, a uhaul would probably be best. In a major quake here in the puget-tropolis we will be locked in, water, bridges and landslides. The FEMA assessment is two weeks to get in relief supplies to Seattle just because of the transportation problems, (have to boat it in) add another week or two get stuff farther out. So I figure we're toast for a month at least.
     
  17. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    There is a complete sub-forum in the survivalist boards forum on vehicles/transportation with a LOT of threads and discussion on BOVs, and I put in some threads and posts there, but here are some thoughts to start with.

    1) Context. What will work for you depends on your situation. What is good for someone else is not necessarily good for you. So you really need to think about things like:

    a) The scenarios you are going to use it in.
    b) Where you are going and where you are coming from.
    c) How many people and how much cargo you are hauling.

    2) In general I prefer AWD or 4WD vehicles. It is just too easy to get stuck, even on a road, if you get in a situation where you are traction challenged. I live on a private paved road off a county gravel road.

    When it snows, or there is freezing rain here my 2WD/RWD low slung daily driver (BMW coupe) just won't make it - if it makes it out of the driveway it has a challenge near the upper end of the road, then on multiple points along the county road. That is one reason why I have two 4WD trucks and my next daily driver will be a small AWD. About once a year I have to use one of the trucks to get down off the mountain and back home again - and that is just staying on the road.

    If it snows and gov. services are stopped or overwhelmed, there will probably be no snow plowing. Where I live, we are one of the last to get plowed simply because we are not on a main road. I remember when I was shopping for houses, one house out in the boonies I could not get to with my car for 2 weeks because the snow was not plowed on that road and my car simply could not handle more than 4 inches of snow.

    3) Something with some ground clearance.

    4) I strongly prefer manual transmissions. Ever try to push/pull/roll start an automatic transmission? With most automatic transmissions, it simply isn't going to happen. If the starter system or the battery is dead, you are going nowhere with a manual transmission (yes, you can jump the battery - maybe).
     
  18. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Currently in the middle of rebuilding my 1948 Willys CJ-2A with upgraded Brakes, Steering, Overdrive, Locking rear axle, 12V, on board inverter, On board air, Hard top, upgraded tires, Hot Rodded original 134L 4 banger, Original Tranny and transfer case. With two simple modifications that can be done on the trail it will have the ability to ford a 3' deep body of water.

    When done it will do 65mph all day long, and crawl over rough terrain at less then 1 mph. With the upgrades to the engine and drive train will get 17+mpg and will carry 20 gallons of fuel.
    It will have a complete Pioneering tool set as well as self recovery equipment and self repair equipment. Within 15 min it can be converted to a EMP proof ignition and the parts will be carried on board as well as other major spares. A complete tool kit will also be on board as will various fluids.

    Oh and I have the ability to hand crank the engine beat that..
     
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  19. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    If you have the land and can afford the feed bill, these don't need a road, certainly emp proof and in a crunch you can eat them.

    dscn0153.jpg
     
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  20. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I don't have firsthand experience, but if I was going to go with riding/pack animals, it would be mules not horses.

    Beyond that, animals require pasture and upkeep.

    I can go park my truck or motorcycle in my shop all winter without so much as a single look at it, and it will be ready to go next spring just fine.

    Not everybody has the time or other resources to take care of animals. I don't even have a cat or dog.
     
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