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A Good BOB?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by manakiah, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. manakiah

    manakiah Issaquah Wa Member

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    I'm looking for a good BOB. Just wondering what type of bag you guys suggest? I'm not sure if I should go the back packer route like an REI bag or more millitary style? Any suggestions?
     
  2. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    What is your plan? Got to have a plan to know how to equip for the journey.

    jj
     
  3. manakiah

    manakiah Issaquah Wa Member

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    Bug out. We will head east over the Mtn into better growing country. We have bikes and bike trailer but I also want to have a set up for being on foot if need be. My family and I live in an apartment {bugging in} is not posible. We have been gardening at the local community garden to learn how to grow food.
     
  4. gettersideways

    gettersideways PNW New Member

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    Think of how big you want it. Do you want it to contain EVERYTHING or just some basics? I was looking into a medium to large size waterproof duffel bag that also has backpack straps. It's a BOB for my truck though and will just contain enough for me and a couple people for a few days. But dry contents inside of a bag would be a great thing to have. Especially in Washington :)
     
  5. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    How much weight do you intend to carry?

    jj
     
  6. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    Might I suggest that you have your future stashed where you plan to end up so what you carry will be easier to plan.

    jj
     
  7. manakiah

    manakiah Issaquah Wa Member

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    50lbs to 60lbs and weapons
     
  8. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    Well, walking you might make ten miles a day with 60lbs plus weapons if your family is involved. With that much weight you need three thousand calories a day per person normally so how many miles do you intend to walk?

    jj
     
  9. stitchclimber

    stitchclimber St. Louis Active Member

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    Might I suggest a Military Surplus MOLLE pack? or better yet the hybrid pack blended between a MOLLE pack and an ALICE ruck?
     
  10. nitestocker

    nitestocker woodland washington Well-Known Member

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    if your going to walk that much get your self a external frame back pack with a hydration setup there cheaper and better than your military type bags find yourself a nice kelty back pack for 50.0 to 75.00 on craigslist. a lot of people buy all this survival stuff and never leave there couches . first get in shape . learn to make dead falls and snares they work 24/7 me myself ill just dig in here and stay as long as possible good luck
     
  11. Martini_Up

    Martini_Up NW USA Well-Known Member

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    if you have the money, go to REI and have them fit you pack for the weight of gear you're going to carry.

    i don't understand all the love for mil.surp. gear (alice packs specifically) when there is so much better. i truly believe these people never had to carry an alice pack for any distance with any weight... at least haven't done it in a few decades.:laugh:
     
  12. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

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    Bobs your uncle
     
  13. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    The one thing I've learned in the 4 years since building my BoB; use it. Get out at least once a week with your full pack and head up to a park; Tabor or Forest and walk some trails. If you don't know how it feels on your back you're not going to understand how it'll weigh you down. After my third trip out I lost about 10 pounds out of the pack and redistributed the weight to better suit my stride.

    #1 rule; make everything have multiple uses. Means you have less to carry overall.
     
  14. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

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    For serious backpacking with a frame pack, the well-fitted padded hip belt was designed by angels! The hips share the load with the shoulders to give you a better balance, for SO much less stress and ache. And a mesh back panel on the frame keeps you SO much cooler and comfie. It took me years to accept and catch up to improvements in backback technology, but it was well worth investing in premium, up-to-date equipment from outdoor specialty stores. One size does NOT fit all.........................elsullo :p
     
  15. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

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    60 pounds is serious weight especially if you are going to cross the Cascade Range. You will need a frame pack with a good hip belt to bear the weight on your hips. You will also need serious blister 1st aid kits.
    Personaly I would bury some 5 gallon bucket caches along your route as well.
     
  16. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    May I suggest the Arc'teryx Tango. It is based on the USMC Ruck sack.

    SF-
     
  17. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

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    50lbs and plus I would suggest a pack with a frame...MOLLE attachments are OK but not required.

    I, honestly, have a cheapo bag...but I'm carrying 45lbs tops- and thinking of moving the canteens from the bag to an LBE/LBV platform to remove the weight off my back and to my shoulders.

    45lbs is with a lot of stuff...change of clothes, tent, canteens (with water), E-tool, ect., ect.

    50lbs before a weapon I would suggest bringing the weight down. If not, I would suggest something like an ALICE Pack.

    If you bring the weight down I would suggest a Maxpedition pack.
     
  18. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Greater Seattle Area Member

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    Depends on the length of time you plan. Sounds like yours is a "I'm Never Coming Home" scenario. In which case, advance preps are necessary I think. Humping 50-60lbs is hard work. Military personnel might lump more, but they condition for it in training, and don't get much choice in their gear.

    You can set up the basics and be relatively lightweight. I run a medium ALICE on a medium frame. It was cheap when I bought it, and it is a pretty tough piece of gear. A lot of people I think go the milsurp route for two reasons:
    Cost, and durability. My pack runs about 33lbs... I have a MSS using the patrol bag, and gortex bivvy, a military surplus poncho, milsurp canteens, cup, stove, and carriers. Spare clothes, about a week worth of food if rationed right, tools etc. If I could get a e-tool for digging (money is tight), I'd have about 35lbs without ammo and guns.

    Bear in mind though, that a few pounds are just the pack itself. Modern packs weigh a lot less, and can be just as durable. It's a matter of what you can afford, and are willing to hump through the woods. I would consider 50lbs the max weight for anything extra going on my back. As it is, I wish I could cut the weight down, but many of my core items for shelter are very durable, and weren't overly expensive... so I consider this the trade off there. Eventually I would like to get a hybrid frame (MOLLE style, ALICE compatible), and lash on a MOLLE sleep carrier. Heard it referred to as a MALICE pack... a name which I am rather fond of.

    Kelty makes some nice packs that have a lot of space, have hydration compatibility, and are very light. If money isn't much of a concern, I would look at those as solid options (Marmot makes some too I think, and ALPS doesn't seem all that bad).

    I agree with the philosophy of taking your gear out and testing it. I try to do one to two trips a year, with one being tentatively scheduled at the moment. The BOB should be tested frequently, thought through, and always re-evaluated. I think it is great that you asked here first. You can save your self equipment grief by getting feedback before you take a particular course of action. This is how I ended up with extra gear (not as durable as my BOB's current contents) that is now comprising my EDC pouch.

    I also advise making a smaller Every Day Carry kit. This doesn't have to be anything fancy. I use mine as a get home kit, and it is still being developed. This should be the basics for surviving your expected scenario, should you be somewhere other than where your BOB is located (get to where that is, grab it, and get out).

    If you want some suggestions on basics to add, feel free to post somewhere. You could also PM me if you feel like it, and I can share my experiences with my stuff, and see if there are any ideas that you want to run with.