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A Food Garden Can add 5-7% on the value of your home:

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by MikeE, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. MikeE

    MikeE Portland Well-Known Member

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  2. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

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    Makes good logical rationale senese to me, so uh what is wrong this picture.. :) Just kidding good post thanks for sharing
     
  3. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

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    That is a very misleading statement (and not true) in regards to real estate in the northwest.
     
  4. MikeE

    MikeE Portland Well-Known Member

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    What is your take on it? Why do you think it's wrong? (not being argumentative, want to know).
     
  5. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Guess I have it covered with 900 sq feet of raised beds.. house is still underwater tho. Probably will have to do jinglemail after we build our new home
     
  6. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

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    Have been in and around the real estate industry (sales and appraisals) for a couple decades now. In the Pacific Northwest a garden adds $0 in value; there is no adjustment to be made for one. I imagine this is the same throughout most of the country. There might be some value added in a big metro area like NYC, but I've got no experience there. Then again, they did mention Zillow as a reference, so you're on the wrong track before you even get started. Not to say a garden might add to saleability (might also take away - depends on the buyer), there is just no added monetary value (like the article is getting at).
     
  7. FortunateSon

    FortunateSon Marion County Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I agree with ch139. I don't have any real knowledge on the subject, just my opinion based on our search when buying the two homes we purchased since 1998.

    A nice garden might be appealing to some potential buyers, making a sale more likely, but it will also turn some off because they prefer the yard for kids, pets, etc.
     
  8. MikeE

    MikeE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Here's why I thought this post by John Robb might be accurate. As a landscaper, I do direct mail marketing into various high-income zip codes in the PDX region. During the late 90's and up till '04, much of my business came from 97229 areas in E Washington Co where newer high end developments had gone in. All-drive, no sidewalk areas where the interest was 100% ornamental landscaping.
    Since the crash, most of my business now comes from city zip codes, particularly in NE and SE. Most new business comes from folks who want to integrate food growing plants into an ornamental landscape. Walkable neighborhoods, and lots of food gardening happening. Does this mean that people have added value to their individual homes with gardens as the OP states? I have no idea. I do believe that these neighborhoods have become more economically viable than similar income-level ares in the 'burbs. More desirable to live in, with properties MAYBE selling more easily.
    Anyway, that's my observation.