A bit of hunting history

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by aflineman, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. aflineman

    aflineman
    Both South of Eugene and East of Portland.
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    Ran across this tidbit while researching Market Hunting in Oregon. Other interesting stuff also, but this one caught my eye.

    Salem (Oregon) Online History - Hunting

     
  2. orygun

    orygun
    West Linn
    Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Very cool. Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. Varmit

    Varmit
    Beaverton, OR
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    Yes indeed!!
     
  4. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman
    Vernonia
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    Think I'm gonna move to Sacremento and get paid to goose hunt. Still works that way right?
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch
    Forest Grove, Oregon
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    If you are a hunter, in many respects THESE are the "good ol' days".

    However, I am old enough to remember pheasants still VERY plentiful in any outlying area only a short distance away from Portland. Habitat destruction might be a factor, but I don't see pheasants now in areas unchanged for cover/habitat since that time.

    These observations lead me to believe that predators (housecats especially, but also the complete end to raptor killing/coyote poisoning) are the main factor that a big ringneck rooster is not a critter seen daily (if at all) anymore.
     
  6. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5
    Western OR
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    I believe the lack of trapping contributes to this as well.

    Back in the day, the higher number of trappers did a much better job of controlling/containing/limiting predator numbers.

    Opossums, skunks, and foxes are enjoying the lack of trapping, coupled with the steady supply of free eats that comes with suburban development.

    Then there's the fact that the average farmer had no illusions about what would happen if he let small-medium predator populations go unchecked, so he dealt with them as he saw fit.
    That rarely happens anymore.
     
  7. hermannr

    hermannr
    Okanogan Highlands
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    Opossums are not native to the NW, they were imported from the SE, and yes, when it comes to bird eggs, Opossum love them. That could be part of one of the problems.

    Pheasants and other game birds like seeds (grain and weed seed), they also like small insects and need cover. I think part of it is everyone, 100 years ago, had a small grain plot and hay for their horses and cows. Farms were small, so there was a lot of fence line cover, there were major Coydog control efforts by everyone, and trapping fox was a viable way of sustaining a minor cash flow.

    ideal bird habitat is not large plots of land constantly cultivated, or suburban housing developments, it is small subsistence farms lightly cultivated.

    Up here were we live there are a lot of turkey. Major changes in turkey population come with cool wet springs (like the last couple). Hatchling survival rates really drop. In dry years I have seen flocks of 40-50 in my yard (hens and chicks) drinking out of the water I have out for the stock and the deer. In wet years the hens are there, but the number of chicks are much lower with the flock closer to 20 or so. I don't know about pheasants, but I expect weather can influence their hatching success rate too. Lots of variables.
     
  8. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch
    Forest Grove, Oregon
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    Bingo. Clean Sweep there, Jamie.
     

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