9mm snubby revolvers

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Who has one? All brands. What do like/dislike?

Seems like you have to shoot +p 38 special out of snubbys to get reliable hollow point performance and a 9mm wheel gun would compliment the semi auto nicely, giving enough velocity for reliable expansion.
 
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Several over the years have cataloged one of these. Few seem to ever catch on. when I was using a 5 shooter I often wanted one but they were VERY hard to ever find. To me the round was a far better choice, 9mm vs .38 special but the market did not like them. Ruger still catalogs one but I have never actually seen one in their LCR line.
 

Loflyer94

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I have a 3" round butt S&W 547, a 9mm K frame, and it was a tack driver right out of the box. I bought it new in the early 80's and have absolutely enjoyed it. My only regret is that I didn't go into debt at the time to also pick up a 4" square butt to make a set. It was the test-bed for all of my 9mm reloading experiments over the decades because of how solid it was.
 
Ive had an unusual fascination with auto cartridges in revolvers for quite some time, never have been able to pick one up as the always seem to be “just” out of reach for budgetary reasons.

to the OP, good luck on you search!
 

salmon creek gary

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I have an LCR 9mm and a small handful of the moon clips. The gun shoots OK, not too much felt recoil, but I discovered a problem with the concept of using autoloader ammuniton in a revolver. At least in a light revolver like my LCR9. Using ammo without a very good crimp can (and probably will) result in "bullet creep" or even "crimp jump". Simply put, every cartridge loaded in a revolver is located nearly in-line with the recoil force from every round that is fired. Without a good crimp, the relatively massive projectile of unfired rounds will tend to remain in place while the lighter casings (captive in the cylinder) move sharply rearward. Each shot fired adds a little"bullet creep" to the cartridges that remain in the cylinder.

What follows is the short version of an extreme "crimp jump" incident that I described here over a year ago.

I was on the range for LEOSA requalification. I started with a full load (5 rounds) of Blazer Brass and fired a 4 round drill, after which the remaining (fifth) round's projectile simply fell out the front of the cylinder. A fluke, we thought. I reloaded and fired a 3 round drill, after which one of the two remaining projectiles dropped to the ground at my feet. The RSO halted the qualification at that point. We pondered a minute or so before the RSO insightfully blamed the ammo. Loaded with a different (better) brand of ammunition, I was allowed to continue the qualification course without another "crimp jump" incident.

Later experimentation revealed that even that "better" brand of ammunition suffered some "bullet creep" with each round fired. Not only that, each successive shot from a full load consistently hits slightly higher than the preceding shot. That rising string of hits may be related to "bullet creep", or maybe not. Needless to say, my Ruger LCR9 is not my go-to for EDC.
 
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I have an LCR 9mm and a small handful of the moon clips. The gun shoots OK, not too much felt recoil, but I discovered a problem with the concept of using autoloader ammuniton in a revolver. At least in a light revolver like my LCR9. Using ammo without a very good crimp can (and probably will) result in "bullet creep" or even "crimp jump". Simply put, every cartridge loaded in a revolver is located nearly in-line with the recoil force from every round that is fired. Without a good crimp, the relatively massive projectile of unfired rounds will tend to remain in place while the lighter casings (captive in the cylinder) move sharply rearward. Each shot fired adds a little"bullet creep" to the cartridges that remain in the cylinder.

What follows is the short version of an extreme "crimp jump" incident that I described here over a year ago.

I was on the range for LEOSA requalification. I started with a full load (5 rounds) of Blazer Brass and fired a 4 round drill, after which the fifth round's projectile simply fell out the front of the cylinder. A fluke, we thought. I reloaded and fired a 3 round drill, after which the two remaining projectiles dropped to the ground at my feet. The RSO halted the qualification at that point. We pondered a minute or so before the RSO insightfully blamed the ammo. Loaded with a different (better) brand of ammunition, I was allowed to continue the qualification course without another "crimp jump" incident.

Later experimentation revealed that even that "better" brand of ammunition suffered some "bullet creep" with each round fired. Not only that, each successive shot from a full load consistently hits slightly higher than the preceding shot. That rising string of hits may be related to "bullet creep", or maybe not. Needless to say, my Ruger LCR9 is not my go-to for EDC.
I have heard of creep in magnum revolvers before, that is certainly a sketchy proposition. As a reloader myself I can mitigate this somewhat as I have control over that process...for others this is indeed unfortunate
 

The Heretic

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I want revolvers in 9mm, .40 and .45 ACP. I wouldn't mind having a 10mm revolver that could also handle .40 S&W.

But I won't want snubbies. I want any of my revolvers to have at least a 3" barrel, but not more than 5 inches. I've owned two snubbies - a CA Bulldog .44 and a Ruger SP101 in .357. Both were a handful and I believe it was in no small part due to the short barrel (but also the light weight). I also prefer the balance and style of the longer barrels.

My reasoning for revolvers in semi-auto chamberings is that if (probably when) certain political scenarios come to pass, it would be advantageous to have revolvers that handle the thousands of rounds of 9mm/40/45 that I have stocked up (ditto with lever/bolt/etc. rifles for .308, 7.62x39 and 5.56, which I already have covered).
 
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I've had a few S&W 940's at one time I had 2 standard 940's and one "J" comp. Never should have sold the "J" comp it had 3" ported barrel and two cylinders one in 9mm luger (9x19) and one in 356 TSW (9×21.5).
Big fan of "J" frame Smith's have a few but only one 940 now.
Never had problems with bent clips like some people seem to have.
Can carry two reloads in about the same space as one speed loader for my .357 and from a ~2" barrel.
I don't see much difference between 357 and 9mm.
Haven't tried any of the other brands however wouldn't mind getting my hands on one of the plastic Rugers.
The one "problem" I've had is having the chambers foul with some loads. Easy to take care of with a stainless steel chamber brush, much better results than using a copper barrel brush.
 
OP
H
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I have an LCR 9mm and a small handful of the moon clips. The gun shoots OK, not too much felt recoil, but I discovered a problem with the concept of using autoloader ammuniton in a revolver. At least in a light revolver like my LCR9. Using ammo without a very good crimp can (and probably will) result in "bullet creep" or even "crimp jump". Simply put, every cartridge loaded in a revolver is located nearly in-line with the recoil force from every round that is fired. Without a good crimp, the relatively massive projectile of unfired rounds will tend to remain in place while the lighter casings (captive in the cylinder) move sharply rearward. Each shot fired adds a little"bullet creep" to the cartridges that remain in the cylinder.

What follows is the short version of an extreme "crimp jump" incident that I described here over a year ago.

I was on the range for LEOSA requalification. I started with a full load (5 rounds) of Blazer Brass and fired a 4 round drill, after which the fifth round's projectile simply fell out the front of the cylinder. A fluke, we thought. I reloaded and fired a 3 round drill, after which the two remaining projectiles dropped to the ground at my feet. The RSO halted the qualification at that point. We pondered a minute or so before the RSO insightfully blamed the ammo. Loaded with a different (better) brand of ammunition, I was allowed to continue the qualification course without another "crimp jump" incident.

Later experimentation revealed that even that "better" brand of ammunition suffered some "bullet creep" with each round fired. Not only that, each successive shot from a full load consistently hits slightly higher than the preceding shot. That rising string of hits may be related to "bullet creep", or maybe not. Needless to say, my Ruger LCR9 is not my go-to for EDC.

This is a great point. I’m a hand loader and familiar with the potential for Bullet creep in revolvers but hadn’t thought of using “normal” 9mm loads and having that problem
 
I only really have experience with revolvers in .45 ACP, even those few. I have to admit the Charter Arms in automatics cartridges, including the 9㎜ looks interesting, though of those offerings, I'd go with the Forty-Five. :)
 

The Heretic

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The CA revolvers seem to have a nice ejector mechanism that holds onto the extractor groove without a moon clip. CA also, at one time or another, made some auto pistol revolvers with longer barrels. If I ever see one with the right barrel length/style I might try it out.
 

WAYNO

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I've owned and/or shot many revolvers in 9mm and the other ACP chamberings, both in DA and SA.

In every case, the auto cartridges have worked admirably, especially from short barrels. Most revolver chamberings in traditional calibers require a long barrel for the advertised potential of a given revolver cartridge. Not so with the auto cartridges. They achieve their advertised velocity from much shorter barrels. 9mm, for example, generally perform better than any .38 Special cartridge, even of +P persuasion.

Now we've got another issue. Although the auto cartridge chamberings have impressive velocities from shorter revolvers, it's at a price. You've got to be willing to deal with moon clips, or expect to empty the fired empties with a pencil. Moon or half moon clips are a non issue to many, but to me, they're too inconvenient. I almost never use them. At the range, using a dowel or pencil on the bench requires very little extra time. And that's of course assuming you don't have one of the few revolvers designed to extract and eject rimless cartridges.

P1050220.jpg
This speed Six in 9mm is arguably the best of the best of snubby 9mm revolvers.:cool:
 
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I found a solution for the moon clip conundrum back when I had a .45 ACP revolver:

  • For carry and some range shooting, steel moon clips loaded like normal.
  • For plinking, I found these polymer clips that were super easy to load. Just squish the cartridges in, eject, and flick them out. I wouldn't use them for carry because every now and again (very rarely) I'd get a failure to fire. The manufacturer said their theory was the was just enough give with the polymer that sometimes the primer would fail to be set off. Not for carry, of course, but for sunny afternoons plinking, good enough, and took the hassle out of moon clips.
 

DLS

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Moon clips are pretty inexpensive so having a bunch is not a big deal. Load them up when you have time, like when sitting on your duff watching TV and keep them stashed and ready to go. Hitting the range or a match is now pretty easy ... grab gun ... grab ammo ... shoot! I have two revolvers that use clips, and enough clips to go through a full match or range session. Easy peasy, and no lost brass, even when doing speed reloads outdoors in grass or gravel.
 
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