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9mm shield for someone with a weak grip.

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by NoSmoking, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    Hi all, I've posted on this forum a few times before getting really great advice

    as I've said before, my hands are fairly small with arthritis that affects my grip. I was leaning toward the shield because of its smaller grip and in a few reviews its said the recoil is manageable for its size.
    I've shot a single action revolver (in .38 special, not sure model) just fine, also the M&P 22 and I believe it was the Browning high power in 9mm both "OK". The grips were a little large for me, but still manageable. Recoil on the browning was OK too after the first shot (mind you, it was my first time ever shooting something in 9mm) I did have to readjust my grip after each shot though.

    The only double action trigger pull I can handle (so far) was the M&P22. Single actions seem to be easiest for me.

    My interest is still the shield because holding it, it fits like a glove for me. I had the opportunity to shoot it but had a really hard time racking the slide and even pulling the trigger. Aside from just working on hand strength (already on it) is there anything else that I can do to the shield itself so I can practice with it immediately, then change it back once my hand strength is up to par?
    Recoil on the shield is a slight concern for me, I've always read that smaller guns have snappier recoil than full size guns (which makes perfect sense.) My wife shot it and she said after about 25 rounds it started to bite a little after each shot. In a defensive situation I don't expect to shoot more than 2 rounds anyway, so its more of loss of control on the first shot that does concern me.

    So my question is pretty much, given the known info, should I just give up on the shield for now (unless I can mod it somehow) get something else... and if I need to find something else, what would you guys recommend?


    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Single actions generally have the best triggers if we are talking semi-autos. Single actions generally have hammers.. if you cock the hammer first before racking the slide, the force necessary to do so is greatly reduced.
    Some pistols are DA/SA that can be either carried with the hammer down for a first shot being DA and the rest SA or with the hammer cocked and carried with the safety on.
     
  3. SPHBS

    SPHBS Portland Active Member

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    I'd start with the Apex trigger kit for the shield. Its one the most popular for those shooting the M&P full size/pro/etc., for USPSA. I've read a couple reviews where it's dropping the pull by 2-3 lbs.

    I'd also consider the Talon rubber grip wrap. I just put it on my shield and it is awesome. With a tackier grip, you don't have to use a death grip on the pistol to keep a solid grip. It is very thin so it doesn't add any real noticeable bulk.
     
  4. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    Thanks SPHBS. So apex trigger kit and talon grip wraps sound good.

    As for racking, I assume that on the browning it's manageable because its a larger gun to began with.. the shield because its smaller making the spring more stiff? I'm I pretty much stuck with it as is, no mods for it?
     
  5. SPHBS

    SPHBS Portland Active Member

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    I don't know of any aftermarket springs/recoil assemblies for the shield, yet. Springs wear out/lose their stiffness due to repeated cycling. However, if/when you get your shield, put it in slide lock for a day or two. When I put in new a new spring in a magazine, I usually do this and it seems like it helps loosen the spring up more quickly. Even if it doesn't really do anything, it won't hurt either...
     
    NoSmoking and (deleted member) like this.
  6. JSJPDX

    JSJPDX East Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    So when you rack the slide are you holding the grip and pulling the slide back? If so, try another method. Holding the gun at mid chest level and close to your body, use the thumb and index finger of your weak hand to hold the serrations at the rear of the slide and then cup the remainder of your hand and fingers around/over the slide. Make sure no part of your hand is over the end of the barrel. With your strong hand, push the frame of the gun forward all the way and then let it back. When you do it this way you are putting most of the pressure against the web of your strong hand rather than the knuckles of your weak hand. I know from experience that this helps when the arthritis in my hands is acting up. This is also the best way for some smaller/weaker shooters to rack the slide on a larger pistol.
     
    MikeE, NoSmoking, Old as Dirt and 3 others like this.
  7. Nimbus

    Nimbus Walla Walla Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    Another thing to consider is when people with weak grips or wrists can have many mis-fires because a semi-auto action depends on some resistance to function properly. I saw this numerous times when new recruits were learning to shoot a semi-auto when I was an LEO.

    Recently my 70+ year old father-in-law wanted to try out my KelTec PF9. He has also had some wrist issues & surgeries. Well, he experienced numerous feeding issues with my PF9 that has NEVER jammed on me.

    He ended up bying a small revolver.
     
  8. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Unless concealed carry is the idea, buy something larger and heavier. That will dampen recoil and many larger guns are hammer fired guns that will allow you to cock the hammer before racking the slide, as was mentioned previously. Also, JSJPDX's advice about racking the slide is valid.
    You might even consider a Glock 19 in 9mm. It's pretty ergonomic. It's a locked breach which is usually provides an easier to rack slide. It's also pretty soft on recoil. If you have hand strength issues, you need to be able to grip the gun firmly enough to keep it from having feeding problems like Nimbus mentioned. I think the Glock is pretty forgiving in this area, too.
    I'm not a Glock "fan", but you may just find one of them fits your specific needs. I'd suggest a double action revolver, but fear the trigger pull may stop you from comfortably firing the gun.
     
  9. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    I have a weak left grip
    that's what makes me train harder
    Sorry if I burst your Bubble:
    Own a gun; own the responsibility
    Being an adult ain't easy
     
  10. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    JSJPDX, specifically on the shield, that method sounds familiar. However it was a very cold morning though, it's entirely possible I didn't give it a good enough try. Had I had more time on the range I would have gave it another go, but felt rushed to choose a gun I could actually use. (other students were ready to go)

    orygun I'll check out the glock 19 the next time I can handle some guns, thanks!

    erudne, you bet. I'm working on it =)
     
  11. MikeE

    MikeE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Glock 19 is great advice, as is the alternate way to rack the slide. You might also check out the M&P 9C, a little bigger than the Shield, a little easier to grip than the G19 or G26.
     
    NoSmoking and (deleted member) like this.