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9mm Lee Factory Crimp Die

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by RVTECH, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Before I drop $13 - $15 on one of these I want to know opinions of those who have and use them. Do they work similarly as well on pistol ammo as rifle? Thanks.
     
  2. Capn Jack

    Capn Jack Wet-Stern Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    For a semi-auto, I've found a tapered crimp die the only way to go. If you think about it, with a
    wheel gun, you are placing each cartridge into the chambers (cylinder). If it doesn't go, you discard
    it. With a semi-auto, each cartridge is jammed into the chamber. If it's not right it sticks and a stuck
    case can ruin your day, or your life.;)

    PS. I also check all loaded semi-auto rounds in a chamber gauge

    Jack...:cool:
     
  3. SinisterSouthpaw

    SinisterSouthpaw SW WA Active Member

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    The Lee FCD for rifle necks is a different animal from the Lee FCDs for pistol and revolver loads. Basically, the pistol crimper is a taper as mentioned above - and not really different from any other brand of taper crimp die, as far as I know. The revolver crimper is a roll crimper and also not unique in the business.

    I have a taper crimp die for the 9mm and do use it to put on a very light crimp, especially when I am loading older brass which I think might be getting too springy and may relax a bit along the bullet's bearing surface. I use plated bullets and don't care to take a chance on deforming them with a crimp that's too heavy since there is no cannelure. I've loaded 9mm in newebrassss without a crimp and without a problem- in light target loads.
     
  4. Otter

    Otter Oregon - mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    I asked this very question of someone using Lee dies to reload 9mm, as I was in the market for 9mm dies. He uses the 3 die set, thus no "Factory Crimp Die" is used by him. He is able to get all the crimp he needs using the seater die which is designed to crimp the case. I have a 3 die Lee set for reloading 380 ACP and I can crimp as little or as much as I want with the seating die. Not sure why you need the Factory Crimp Die....
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    The Lee Factory Crimp die, specifically for the 9mm the OP mentioned, is not just a "Crimp" die but also a final sizing die.

    When it crimps the finished case it places a taper crimp on the bullet but also, with the carbide ring just inside the mouth of the die, does a final sizing of the finished cartridge. Makes sure there are no bulges that might have formed while seating bullets that would prevent the round from properly chambering.

    Among competition shooters it's widely used because they can't afford any stoppages due to oversized cases, etc.

    I started using one about 10 years ago and those occasional sticky cartridges are a thing of the past. Don't even need to use the case gauge or play around by removing the barrel and seeing if rounds properly fit it.

    Lee offers this die for most straight walled pistol cases.

    The FCD for rifle cases is a collet type die that squeezes the proper crimp on the neck. Super easy to adjust and no more bulged cases due to varying length on cases.

    For the cost these Factory Crimp Dies are well worth the money, especially when using a progressive press.
     
  6. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    That is what precipitated my question about the 9mm version. I started using the FCD for 30-30 (notorious for bulged case necks) with no more problems.
     
  7. Mikeobwan

    Mikeobwan Tri-Cities New Member

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    Deadshot has it right.

    The real advantage of a Lee FCD is that it "Irons" out the case. It's almost like a bulge buster. It does a very good job of taking any bulges or inconsistencies out of the case. I run a FCD on all of my pistol reloads as my last stage.. The only crimp I use is just to make sure the "Bell" is out of the case. I've had no feeding problems with 9mm or 40s&w since I started using the FCD.
     
  8. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Well then I see one in my future. One of the problems I AM having with my 'new' CZ 75 is it seems to have a more snug chamber than other autos I have owned with an occasional FTF. I don't entirely blame the gun but I have several hundred NOS 125 gr Speer SP bullets (circa 1978) I want to use up and the soft lead points do not feed consistently. Probably why Speer does not make this bullet anymore.
     
  9. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Ahah! A CZ. Yes indeed they have snug chambers, well actually a little short. They have a different throat angle than most others and some bullets will hit the lands sooner than a same OAL cartridge in another pistol. You may have to set your OAL shorter for the CZ than another pistol of the same caliber. Sometimes the slide would have enough inertia to go fully into battery by jaming the bullet into the lands, sometimes not.

    I found this out when I added a CZ75 SP-01 to my arsenal. Started shooting it with handloads that worked perfectly in my Sig.

    Take the barrel out and test fit some finished cartridges. I found that an OAL of 1.125" works great in my Sig and my CZ using a Montana Gold JHP or Speer GDHP.
     
  10. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Yep - I am only having the occasional hang up with the 'old' Speer bullets so maybe I'll use 'em up in .38/.357 and stick to non-half jacketed styles - which most 'nines' seem to prefer anyway.
     
  11. Flash

    Flash Vancouver Member

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    I use a Lee FCD for 45acp and I am so happy with it, no more fail to go in battery. They run like new.
     
  12. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    One more question - do you FCD users back your sizing die off so the 'crimp' shoulder does not touch the flare of the case mouth and let the FCD do the job?
     
  13. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Yes but I don't get to concerned if some flare is reduced. I just back off a little so I don't have to run the seater plug in an excessive amount. What you take off by moving the die out you have to make up for with more depth on the seater adjustment.
     
  14. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Got it - More specifically I was thinking ANY seating die crimp could be eliminated when using the FCD. I guess I'll just have to get one and experiment - when someone has one in stock - seems to be a popular item.