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.45 acp reloading

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by TrustInFew, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. TrustInFew

    TrustInFew Parkrose, oregon New Member

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    Any one reload .45 acp? I intend on getting a press and what not for it, but haven't yet. I used to reload my own shot shells, but sold my press. Any ways, I have about 200 .45 rounds that I would like to have re loaded, how much would it be to have someone reload them for me? Or better yet, teach me how to reload brass? I imagine it can't be to much different than shot shell reloading.

    If you can help me out, let me know. I also have some savage 300 brass that needs to be re loaded. So if you can show me how, I will pick up all consumables for it, just walk me through the process.
     
  2. Keane

    Keane Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    I just started reloading .45 ACP, it is actually quite easy! Just pick up a press and tools, and 200 rounds (even on a single stage) will take you only a few hours!

    I'm not sure I'm good enough to charge for reloads yet (I've only done 100 .45, though all but 1 fired perfectly!), but it seems that the projectile is the most expensive part, and it seems to cost about 50% of the cost of a new round for a FMJ.
     
  3. humdrum

    humdrum Lakewood Active Member

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    Start with a good reloading manual such as Richard Lee's "Modern Reloading, second edition". Read it word for word, and then read it again.
    Take your time and be meticulous to the details in every step of the process.
    Don't deviate from the listed recipe.
    Use a good scale.
    Don't rush.
    Have Fun!
     
  4. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

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    I reload 45 on a Dillon SDB. I can easily crank out a 100 rounds in 10 minutes once everything is ready to go
    It's very easy once you take the time to go slow at first and understand the process.
    Also, don't fall for the advice that some give that yiu need to start out on a single stage. Roloading on a progressive press is just about simple mechanics and it is not rocket science - right hand inserts empty brass, left hand places the bullet then pull the lever.... repeat.
     
  5. PX4WA

    PX4WA Tacoma, WA Active Member

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    Just remember you need an FFL to do that... it is illegal for a non FFL to manufacture and sell/distribute reloaded ammo. it is ok to reload and use for personal use but not for others...

    it is ok for another person to reload on your press under your supervision, as long as he pulls the press handle...

    that said, .45acp is one of the best rounds to reload... big price difference (almost half) and it is low pressure, so a bit more margin for safety...
     
  6. PX4WA

    PX4WA Tacoma, WA Active Member

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    I agree on this... if you are serious, get a progressive right away, and just use it one stage at a time until you get the drift of it... doesn't take long, the learning curve is steep but short...

    a single stage is almost a must for accurate rifle rounds.. so if you go that direction eventually, getting a single stage is not a waste of money
     
    rrojohnso and (deleted member) like this.
  7. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    I read somewhere that you can sell reloaded ammo without an ffl, but you can't make a profit. Correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  8. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    45 ACP is very easy to reload. I find you will lose the brass before you wear it out. Not so with .40 S&W, you have to keep a closer eye on that brass for signs it is time to replace it.

    I really recommend learning to reload on a single stage press. There is a lot going on with a progressive press. But maybe your shot shell experience will move you up the loading curve. If you ever think you will want to reload accurate rifle rounds, then the single stage press will not be a waste of time.

    I live in Vancouver, and probably could arrange a time to help you reload your first lot. I have both a single stage and progressive press.
     
    JGRuby and (deleted member) like this.
  9. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    This goes on my top 20 silly questions in a reloading forum.

    The choices are almost limitless. Clays, HP-38, HS-6 all make good loads.
     
  10. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    A very nice, reasonalby price powder for 45's is RED Dot... 4.8->5.2 grains behind a 230gr. RN bullet, lead , jacketed, plated.

    It gives at 5.2 grs. a near match to the old original military load ~~ 850fps-> 870fps. Overall case and bullet length 1.260"

    Case guages work well to make sure they are sized well and will fit your good conditioned 1911 style fire arm.
     
  11. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good load data but my personal, most accurate load is 4 grains of Bullseye ahead of a 200 grain Laser Cast SWC bullet. This load shot a 7 shot, near 1.5" benchrest group one afternoon a few years ago out of my 1991-A1. I know I saved the cutout group and will find it and post a picture.
     
  12. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I believe there is a separate "ammo" license for selling ammo.At least there is one for WA...?
     
  13. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Yes, one can "sell ammo" without a license, Federal or State, as long as you don't make it a business. There's no prohibition against profit but if you sell too often or make too much money it would be considered to them be a business. That would require an "06 FFL" as well as a Washington State Business License. If in a City that requires business licenses, one of them too. Further roadblocks would be the zoning where your "business" is located.

    The "Fed's" will want their 15% excise tax on manufactured ammo, the State will bend you over for the B&O tax, the City for license fees/permits according to any of their ordinances, of course you will have to collect Sales Tax as well

    Want to "sell a few reloads to a friend or relative", go for it. When you "go public" is when the swamp gets deeper. BTW, did I mention Insurance????
     
  14. rdt

    rdt SW Portland Active Member

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    excelent post deadeye. does anyone else think this might be good sticky info? the legality of selling ammo has come up a few times recently. . .
     
  15. noylj

    noylj high desert Active Member

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    .45 Auto:
    Easy to reload.
    I REALLY don't think that a new reloader, with only 200 cases, needs to spend more the $300 for a reloading press they may not want or enjoy.
    People should stop putting their "loves" and "hatreds" on others.
    With only 200 cases, take a tip--start cheap and work up as you learn.
    Buy Lyman #48 or #49 manual and read it.
    The Lee manual is very good, particularly if you start out with Lee equipment. It also contains a really outstanding compilation of load data.
    I would buy the Lee Reloading Press ($25-35, depending on where you buy it), a Lee .45 Auto 4-die set, either a Lee Ram Prime or the Lee Auto-Prime (hand primer, but it needs its own specific shell holders), 100 jacketed bullets, 1000 large pistol primers, a 1 lb bottle of 231, HP38, AA2, Bullseye, or Red Dot.
    Now, the Lee die set includes the shell holder needed for any press that takes a shell holder and a powder dipper. The die set (and Richard Lee's manual) includes specific loads for the dipper (for specific weights of bullets and powder). All these loads are light target loads, so you can't dip too much powder. The use of a dipper means that you can't exceed the target charge weight by more than 0.2gn, and you should be able to simply look to see if the charge is light (doesn't fill the dipper completely), so the loads are safe.
    However, other than loading your initial 25-50 rounds just to see how things work, you will very quickly want to actually weight your charges so you know what you getting. This is particularly true since Lee seems to base all the powder weights on the maximum bulk density of powder (so almost all estimated charge weights for dippers or their Auto-Disk powder measure are heavier than you will get).
    For this, you need a scale/balance andultimately, a powder measure. Other than the Lee Safety Scale, which works as well as any but is more difficult to use, you will need to spend more than $50 for a balance. Likewise, for a bench mounted powder measure, other than the Lee Perfect Powder Measure that works great but leaks when first using it and many people can't accept this), that will run over $70.
    To save money, you can get a powder trickler and trickle your powder to the weight you want. This saves money on a powder measure, but takes time.
    After a while, you will KNOW what you want and you can upgrade as you want to.
    My way will probably cost you a bit less than $100 for your first reloads and the little press will stay with you for all little jobs that you don't want to use the bigger press, you will probably buy, for.
    I load up to .30-06 on my little Lee press and it works well. It isn't as easy to use as a bigger press, but it does the job as well.
     
  16. netcarrier

    netcarrier Portland, Oregon Active Member

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    Hi Trustinfew,
    I can show you how to reload 45 ACP Ammo. I have the Equipment But you would Come by and watch Frist then load them up.
    Email me at netcarrier@yahoo.com
     
  17. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    noylj,I take this approach with every new adventure. Buy the cheap things first.If you decide it wasn't for you,you're not out much money. If you wear it out,then go buy the better stuff.

    I agree to start out with a simple set up or whatever you can get cheapest.(or what your pocket book says you can buy). Then if you shoot too much for the press yo supply,buy a nice progressive set up.

    As far as selling reloads,I don't think it's the best idea,liability wise. Unless you are positive that your friend,more so his widowed wife,won't come sue you.
    Now having the buddy run the machine and do his own,that's another story
     
  18. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    This is OK if one doesn't really know how involved they will get in reloading.

    Not good advice however for someone who is already consuming a lot of ammo and KNOWS that they will reload lots and lots.

    "Starting Cheap" merely increases their investment over time as the cheap/used often wears out too soon or doesn't meet the user's expectations. They then buy the proper equipment only now their total expense was far higher than if they had just started out with adequate equipment to begin with.

    One should first sit down and determine how many rounds of a given caliber they need and whether that's per week, per month, or per year. Then look at the realistic capability of the equipment you're looking at and see if it can even come close to your expectations.

    Sometimes it's better to save for a few more months and go for the more expensive solution thna to waste money by starting out with an inadequate setup. "Cheap" also brings far fewer dollars when you go to dispose of it than the "Quality" should one decide at a future date to get out of the hobby. Check resale values of Dillon, as an example, versus Lee.

    Sometimes it's not how MUCH you pay, it's how many TIMES your have to pay it.
     
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  19. PX4WA

    PX4WA Tacoma, WA Active Member

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    All good advice but not one size fits alll....

    Good thing with quality equipment you can sell it for a good price and likely to be more enjoyable reloading...
     
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  20. noylj

    noylj high desert Active Member

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    Sorry guys. I have had a little Lee Reloading Press for 15 years and a couple of years ago bought another one. I have three 1050s, but the little presses still get used.
    I can't see a reloader NOT having one of these little presses available. I use them to deprime, trim cases, Bulge Bust, and reload small quantities of rifle ammo. It takes a bit more effort than a large press (but less than one would think), but the job is done just as well. Just don't swage bullets or stand on it trying to crimp a rifle round with a Lee FCD.
    One should have a zen-like attitude to shooting and reloading and concentrate on what is needed more than simply what one wants.