Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

.444 Marlin

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Jerry, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Jerry

    Jerry Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    414
    Likes Received:
    254
    Any of you folks shoot the .444 Marlin?

    I've got a chance to get one.

    I have no experience with the caliber & wonder how it would be as an elk & bear cartridge.
     
  2. Box13

    Box13 Beavercreek Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    13
    Plenty of gun...
     
  3. jonn5335

    jonn5335 Longview Active Member

    Messages:
    845
    Likes Received:
    231
    If you don't mind the price of ammo and plan on shooting within 150 or so yards other than that they are good guns
     
  4. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    617
    Good Elk and bear gun. Get it, and start reloading for it.
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Mark's recommendation to reload for it perhaps hinges on two reasons (one of which jonn alluded to). Factory ammo is spendy. BUT: this is not what I would call a "recreational firearm", in that it is more of a "get down to business" hunting rifle, and not something you plink with. Reason number two is that with better bullets than generally available in factory loads, this is a VERY respectable cartridge, and may be the ideal cartridge for your stated purposes: bear and elk on the West Coast. Carrying one, I certainly would NOT limit my shots to 150 yards, especially with optics. 300 grain bullets of stout construction will be best for that work. Early factory loadings (and still some offered) rely on bullets more suitable for pistol application, and may not penetrate very well at the velocities produced by the .444. These are better deer loads.

    On the reverse side, if you do choose to plink with it, reloading can deliver very economical ammo for that purpose, shooting jacketed and cast bullets as suitable for the .44 Magnum. This access to pistol bullets is what makes the .444 a more versatile cartridge than the .45-70 for its afficionados. No owner I have spoken to is anything less than surprised about accuracy, either.

    A buddy in Montana bought one, and I helped him load for it, and he simply loves it. Now (even though I have a Guide Gun in .45-70) I want one.
     
  6. OFADAN

    OFADAN Brownsville, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    286
    One of my hunting buds bought one in the mid 70s. I've seen him shoot plenty of deer in the Coastal Range. He usually harvested with one shot and they are DRT. He is mighty disciplined and well practiced and this makes the difference. He only used iron sights and limited himself to 200 yards and closer.
     
  7. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    871
    I'll take it if you don't want it...:)
     
  8. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Well. So much for my skills in being discreet.:)

    And, since herman took the direct approach, at this point it would not be impolite to ask if you'd tell (us) what you end up paying for it (since we're both motivated shoppers).
     
  9. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    617
    i would like to know the price since i just began to look for one.
     
  10. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    There was a nice "guide gun" version on here in the classifieds a week or so ago...factory integral muzzle brake, straight grip, and all.
     
  11. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    617
    I saw the guide gun. I only like muzzle brakes on 50 BMG. And I don't enjoy the guide guns I have shot.
     
  12. wjv

    wjv SW Washington State Active Member

    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    41
    Expect to pay $50-$60 for 20 rounds of premium hunting ammo (Buffalo Bore or Corbon) 280-305 grain ammo.

    Expect to pay $32-$38 for 20 rounds of standard Remington or Hornady 240-245 grain ammo.

    P1030365.jpg
     
  13. jjackson

    jjackson indiana New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    just thought id put my 2 cents in if any one is still looking economical 444 hr handi riffle 309.00 single shot and heavy add a limbsaver pad and not bad to shoot
     
  14. blackgunsdan

    blackgunsdan Clackamas, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    34
    A buddy of mine shot a deer with my 444 Marlin some years ago; he caught the buck in the left rear hunch at about 50 yards; the bullet stove piped the femur bone, lifting that deer about eight feet into the air twisting it's body into a very strange 360 degree summersault. Once the buck hit the ground we saw that his left rear leg was completely blown off the bone and was only being held on by one tendon. The second shot removed the head.