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Took the gun down to install a manual safety. Taking it apart was a 2 minute breeze. Installing the safety was an all night nightmare. I got to bed at 6:00 AM, the job undone.

The vendor’s 3:00 minute video shows you how easy it is, which is great for sales. Not so easy as you might think. Another video running 9:00 minutes had much more detail that helped with the installation. The devil is in the details. The safety was in and I couldn’t get it out. The safety rubbed, grated, and was not square to the slide. Then it locked up. I lubed the assembly with silicone and today at noon I got it to work.

The battle isn’t over. The gun will not go back together. The slide goes on up to the last 3/16 of an inch, the the guide rod starts to pop out of the front of the slide assembly. The usual suggestions don’t seem to work. An internet review indicates lots of P365 users can’t get their gun back together. It seems to take manipulation of the take down lever and the slide hold open device. Except in the SAS these parts are so abbreviated that the process is very difficult and appears to require 3 hands.

My age is showing. This little gun is plastic, stampings and springs. It may be the marvel of the western world and everybody wants or has one, but I’m reminded of the children’s fairy tale, ”The Emperor’s New Clothes.”

I might use this thing for a fishing sinker and carry something John Browning designed. I might even carry a revolver.

My granddaughter bought one and we shot ours together. They worked fine. She went home to clean it and couldn’t get her’s back together again. She eventually got it. She hasn’t spoken about her 365 SAS but I thing she dumped it and went back to her Ruger.
 
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So I got my P365 back together. The kit to install the safety is a no go.

The safety issue was my fault. I started fairly late in the evening and know better. The vendors 3 minute video is inadequate. Videos running around 10 or 12 minutes are far more detailed and show the correct way to make the safety installation. The take down lever and slide lock play a big role in the process. The miniaturized parts on the SAS make the installation significantly more difficult,

On a different note, the new grip frame module I was sent was not for the SAS model. A standard P365 module will likely need work with a small grinder to allow access to the slide lock, which is key in the whole process. And the hole in the grip frame module for a pin that holds the gun together is too big. The pin will likely come out while shooting.

I did get my safety back by taking a spring out of the fire control unit, which went back together easily.

Not impressed.
 
Took the gun down to install a manual safety. Taking it apart was a 2 minute breeze. Installing the safety was an all night nightmare. I got to bed at 6:00 AM, the job undone.

The vendor’s 3:00 minute video shows you how easy it is, which is great for sales. Not so easy as you might think. Another video running 9:00 minutes had much more detail that helped with the installation. The devil is in the details. The safety was in and I couldn’t get it out. The safety rubbed, grated, and was not square to the slide. Then it locked up. I lubed the assembly with silicone and today at noon I got it to work.

The battle isn’t over. The gun will not go back together. The slide goes on up to the last 3/16 of an inch, the the guide rod starts to pop out of the front of the slide assembly. The usual suggestions don’t seem to work. An internet review indicates lots of P365 users can’t get their gun back together. It seems to take manipulation of the take down lever and the slide hold open device. Except in the SAS these parts are so abbreviated that the process is very difficult and appears to require 3 hands.

My age is showing. This little gun is plastic, stampings and springs. It may be the marvel of the western world and everybody wants or has one, but I’m reminded of the children’s fairy tale, ”The Emperor’s New Clothes.”

I might use this thing for a fishing sinker and carry something John Browning designed. I might even carry a revolver.

My granddaughter bought one and we shot ours together. They worked fine. She went home to clean it and couldn’t get her’s back together again. She eventually got it. She hasn’t spoken about her 365 SAS but I thing she dumped it and went back to her Ruger.

I understand about the 365! I bought one when they came out but got rid of it after a few hundred rounds...I did not do well with the tiny pieces and dumped it for another 1911.
 
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I understand about the 365! I bought one when they came out but got rid of it after a few hundred rounds...I did not do well with the tiny pieces and dumped it for another 1911.

Another thing that is annoying is a take down”lever” with a slotted head. I could find nothing that fit it but a coin. I looked at small parts for the 365 at Sig. They have plenty of parts except P365 take down levers. Looks like lots of folks with SAS models are correcting that issue. Like I said, I’m not impressed. I’m so old I remember when guns were steel and car starters were in the floor next to the clutch.
 

Wombat of Doom

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To be fair, I did the first time. Watched a video that detailed that the take down lever needed to be in just slightly a different position than I had it. Heck, I would love to build one from parts with an 80 percent kit.
 

Certaindeaf

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Heard that after 2000 rounds you have to send those to the factory for a "tune up"? Wow

It took me some fiddling to remove the mag safety on my Ruger ec9.. a lot of guns have micro parts these days.
 
Heard that after 2000 rounds you have to send those to the factory for a "tune up"? Wow

It took me some fiddling to remove the mag safety on my Ruger ec9.. a lot of guns have micro parts these days.
2,000 rounds needing a tuneup? Seriously? Is this based upon CarryTrainer’s YouTube video?

I suspect it’s more reliable than that... But I’ll find out.
 

Wombat of Doom

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Heard that after 2000 rounds you have to send those to the factory for a "tune up"? Wow

It took me some fiddling to remove the mag safety on my Ruger ec9.. a lot of guns have micro parts these days.
mine had over 10k rounds before its first cleaning. Not proud of that fact, but it is a fact. btw, if you do that, actual grit makes the trigger feel gritty. Since I now have a little sonic cleaner it gets the dip more regularly. Mine has been 100% reliable. I had one jam on a piece of tulammo that had a lump of extra steel on the steel case. Since if any gun chambered that one I would have been afraid to pull the trigger, I don't hold it against the p365.
 
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Other than the “take down lever”, there’s shouldn’t be any assembly/disassembly differences between the P365 and P365 SAS. I’ve had my P365 apart several times, no issues with reassembly...

There is a minor but very significant difference between the SAS grip module and the standard P365 module. The same can be said for the slide lock release. The two combined will not allow reassembly of the SAS pistol in a standard P365. There is an obstruction that denies access to the slide lock release.

Putting the SAS in the SAS grip module was a snap. Got it the first time. What I am going to do is swap out the SAS take down lever and slide stop release and put an end to the fracas once and for all. That will be a huge improvement and suit my taste perfectly.
 
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mine had over 10k rounds before its first cleaning. Not proud of that fact, but it is a fact. btw, if you do that, actual grit makes the trigger feel gritty. Since I now have a little sonic cleaner it gets the dip more regularly. Mine has been 100% reliable. I had one jam on a piece of tulammo that had a lump of extra steel on the steel case. Since if any gun chambered that one I would have been afraid to pull the trigger, I don't hold it against the p365.

FYI- I carried a Sig 228 on the job. After every firearms qualification we were required to personally tare our pistol to an armorer who inspected the pistol. A big part of the inspection was testing spring strength. I don’t recall a failed spring ever being replaced. You were just issued a new gun. I have absolutely had Sig magazine springs wear out. I think the bottom line is that autoloaders in general are spring dependent.

When we were issued revolvers we just shot, cleaned our guns and left the range. Meaning there wouldn’t be a spring check if it wasn’t necessary. It was a lot of added work for the armorers.
 
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I installed mine yesterday and learned that Osage's short vid doesn't tell you enough. Watched Sig Guy's you tube vid and had it done in just a few minutes.

Yep, exactly. I watched several videos from different folks that contained critical snippets of information the made the job not only easier, but possible. The “stick it in here” video isn’t making it. Other people really had their act together, thank goodness.
 
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Wombat of Doom

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FYI- I carried a Sig 228 on the job. After every firearms qualification we were required to personally tare our pistol to an armorer who inspected the pistol. A big part of the inspection was testing spring strength. I don’t recall a failed spring ever being replaced. You were just issued a new gun. I have absolutely had Sig magazine springs wear out. I think the bottom line is that autoloaders in general are spring dependent.

When we were issued revolvers we just shot, cleaned our guns and left the range. Meaning there wouldn’t be a spring check if it wasn’t necessary. It was a lot of added work for the armorers.
Yeah, and mine still shoots like a champ. Never had a spring issue on a sig, and and I own a few.
 
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Yeah, and mine still shoots like a champ. Never had a spring issue on a sig, and and I own a few.
The difference might be that you have several, I had the one issued to me. Our ammo arrived in railway boxcars and was stored in military bunkers at Quantico, Virginia. For practical purposes our supply of ammunition was without limit. We shot a lot between qualifications and as I was on a tactical team, we frequently spent entire days shooting. We took our ammo to the range in Suburbans. The quantity was ample for the purpose and was in the multi-thousands.

Pistols wear out. I’ve worn out both a revolver and a pistol. Our pistols were tested regularly for wear, and spring failure got you a new pistol. Our pistols were professional tools that had to be serviceable when the need arose.

But I only got one at a time. Good guns, but not infallible. They do have a service life.
 

Wombat of Doom

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The difference might be that you have several, I had the one issued to me. Our ammo arrived in railway boxcars and was stored in military bunkers at Quantico, Virginia. For practical purposes our supply of ammunition was without limit. We shot a lot between qualifications and as I was on a tactical team, we frequently spent entire days shooting. We took our ammo to the range in Suburbans. The quantity was ample for the purpose and was in the multi-thousands.

Pistols wear out. I’ve worn out both a revolver and a pistol. Our pistols were tested regularly for wear, and spring failure got you a new pistol. Our pistols were professional tools that had to be serviceable when the need arose.

But I only got one at a time. Good guns, but not infallible. They do have a service life.
They inevitably wear out, but given what I have seen, I would expect my p365 to be well into the 6 digits of rounds before it dies. My great uncle had a 1911 he carried in wwii. On his death, my grandfather went to check it out. The rails were so worn out that if turned upside down the slide would come loose.

I have never worn a gun out. Not even close. I have multiple century old semis still kicking. I also have a rather interesting collection that is largely biased to the Great War. Also a decent selection of wwii and cold War arms as well.

Wearing a sig or glock out is rather unlikely for most of us. Most of us rotate between multiple carry guns i do believe and nobody gives me free ammo. I buy or make all mine. Also I am just a normal guy who doesn't want to die before his time. I carry, and am a respectable shot. I have never been on a tactical team.

For me the p365 has been an excellent gun. It replaced my p938 and Ruger lc9s. Truth be told, I prefer a steel gun and I prefer aluminum to polymer. But with better maintenance than when I first got it, it should last a generation or 3.
 
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They inevitably wear out, but given what I have seen, I would expect my p365 to be well into the 6 digits of rounds before it dies. My great uncle had a 1911 he carried in wwii. On his death, my grandfather went to check it out. The rails were so worn out that if turned upside down the slide would come loose.

I have never worn a gun out. Not even close. I have multiple century old semis still kicking. I also have a rather interesting collection that is largely biased to the Great War. Also a decent selection of wwii and cold War arms as well.

Wearing a sig or glock out is rather unlikely for most of us. Most of us rotate between multiple carry guns i do believe and nobody gives me free ammo. I buy or make all mine. Also I am just a normal guy who doesn't want to die before his time. I carry, and am a respectable shot. I have never been on a tactical team.

For me the p365 has been an excellent gun. It replaced my p938 and Ruger lc9s. Truth be told, I prefer a steel gun and I prefer aluminum to polymer. But with better maintenance than when I first got it, it should last a generation or 3.
That’s where almost all of us fit. Wearing out a gun on your own dime is very hard to do unless you are independently wealthy and have a lot of time on your hands. Actually I have a hard time trying to conceive of what that would take on a personal level. I just got lucky with finding a job right after the Iranians released their American hostages back in 1980 or thereabouts. I got a phone call on a Thursday saying I could have the job if I could be there on Monday. Shooting skills were in demand and budgets were large. I stayed until I retired, wearing out guns, airliner seats and passports. Now I’m a geezer with a retirement and I carry a gun because I don’t want to the victim of violent crime.

Yes, guns often travel across generations before wearing out. Even then new parts may put them back in the game. My first pistol, at 14 or15 was a very worn Colt 1911 with a four digit serial number. It cost me $32.80. My mother’s lawyer told her to get rid of it, I was pretty hot at the time but now I see her point.

For me the P365 was a miniature miracle. Then I found myself in a project with poor information, a bad part and a gun that could not be reassembled. It’s sorted out now but I was pretty torqued. I may have been breaking new ground and didn’t know it. And there was an incompatible part in the mix as well, which didn’t help.

On the plus side I was just out back shooting my new to me S&W .22 target pistol. It shoots unbelievably well. That’s enough to make any shooter happy.
 

Certaindeaf

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mine had over 10k rounds before its first cleaning. Not proud of that fact, but it is a fact. btw, if you do that, actual grit makes the trigger feel gritty. Since I now have a little sonic cleaner it gets the dip more regularly. Mine has been 100% reliable. I had one jam on a piece of tulammo that had a lump of extra steel on the steel case. Since if any gun chambered that one I would have been afraid to pull the trigger, I don't hold it against the p365.
What's that have to do with sig saying the pistols need a factory tune up after 2k or what?
 
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