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question.

i purchased some new projectiles (they are quite old actually if that matters) anyway they are 210 grain and when I seat the bullet to the OAL of 3.28 the ribbed area of the bullet is above the case.

it looks unusual - what do you guys think? if I seat it to the case it's 2.6

the bullets are physically smaller than the other bullets i use.
 
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There are only two issues with seating bullets the long way...

The first, and most obvious issue is whether they fit into the magazine.

The next issue is if you are seating very close to the throat, your chamber pressure can spike, usually this isn't an issue unless you are doing very hot loads, but it can be significant enough that you need to be aware of it.

Typically, as long as they fit in the magazine you won't have the second problem. Usually a test for this is done by taking a fired case (from the gun) and lightly sizing the case mouth, then dropping a bullet into the bore (from the chamber) and then closing the bolt on it. Be very careful when doing this, as excessive effort will result in a bullet being stuck in the throat of the gun, which you will then have to get out with a cleaning rod, sometimes requiring a fair amount of effort.

Happy reloading,
 
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There are only two issues with seating bullets the long way...

The first, and most obvious issue is whether they fit into the magazine.

The next issue is if you are seating very close to the throat, your chamber pressure can spike, usually this isn't an issue unless you are doing very hot loads, but it can be significant enough that you need to be aware of it.

Typically, as long as they fit in the magazine you won't have the second problem. Usually a test for this is done by taking a fired case (from the gun) and lightly sizing the case mouth, then dropping a bullet into the bore (from the chamber) and then closing the bolt on it. Be very careful when doing this, as excessive effort will result in a bullet being stuck in the throat of the gun, which you will then have to get out with a cleaning rod, sometimes requiring a fair amount of effort.

Happy reloading,

thanks i talked to a friend and got this sorted. The area I was talking about is the Cantlouver (I know it spelled wrong) anyway the bullet is seated properly but the cantlouver is higher than where it normally would be. cases look fine nothing out of the ordinary. it goes boom targets go boom.

thanks a lot.
 
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do you mean the cannelure? it's the knurled/rebated part on certain bullets where you're supposed to crimp the case mouth into?

Yea, typically that doesn't matter. I've seen bullets with multiple cannelures, and I usually don't crimp the bullets in unless they are going to be rough handled (hunting use ESP).
 
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do you mean the cannelure? it's the knurled/rebated part on certain bullets where you're supposed to crimp the case mouth into?

Yea, typically that doesn't matter. I've seen bullets with multiple cannelures, and I usually don't crimp the bullets in unless they are going to be rough handled (hunting use ESP)

yes thats exactly what I mean...the cantaloupe.:s0155:
 

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