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303 mags

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by probasco, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. probasco

    probasco abeaversboro Member

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    does anyone know of a local place to pick up a new 303 mag? looking for one of those compatible with multiple models. thanks
     
  2. onearmedswordsman

    onearmedswordsman Hillsboro, OR Member

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    rare cartridge! Never heard of them. Sorry I can't be of help.
    Enjoy a free bump!
     
  3. probasco

    probasco abeaversboro Member

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    just a heads up

    The Lee-Enfield bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle was the main firearm used by the military forces of the British Empire/Commonwealth during the first half of the 20th century. It was the British Army's standard rifle from its official adoption in 1895 until 1957.[3][4] The Lee-Enfield used the .303 British cartridge and in Australia and New Zealand the rifle was so well-known that it became synonymous with the term "303". It was also used by the military forces of Canada, India, and South Africa, among others.[5]

    A redesign of the Lee-Metford, which had been adopted by the British Army in 1888, the Lee-Enfield remained in widespread British service until well into the early 1960s and the 7.62 mm L42 sniper variant remained in service until the 1990s. As a standard-issue infantry rifle, it is still found in service in the armed forces of some Commonwealth nations.[6]

    The Lee-Enfield featured a ten-round box magazine which was loaded manually from the top, either one round at a time, or by means of five-round chargers. The Lee-Enfield superseded the earlier Martini-Henry, Martini-Enfield, and Lee-Metford rifles, and although officially replaced in the UK with the L1A1 SLR in 1957, it continues to see official service in a number of British Commonwealth nations to the present day—notably with the Indian Police—and is the longest-serving military bolt-action rifle still in official service.[7] Total production of all Lee-Enfields is estimated at over 17 million rifles.[1]
     
  4. Leif Runenritzer

    Leif Runenritzer Kernilyis Active Member

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    EDIT: Never mind.