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270 bullet set too deep?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Cogs, Mar 23, 2014.

  1. Cogs

    Cogs Washougal, WA. Volunteer Coordinator Staff Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Do I have a problem? Here's what I did.

    I'm new to reloading and this is my first load.

    Reloading for the 270 rifle. Using a Hornady 140gr boatail soft point (BTSP) Interlock. Small powder charge at 42gr of IMR 4064. Book says C.O.A.L at 3.280". My cartridge is a Winchester.

    I set mine at 3.107. A difference of .173" shorter O.A.L. The bullet is seated just past the ribbing and, to me, looks a little too deep.

    I came up with this length by marking the cleaning rod with the bolt closed and again with the bullet in the barrel, measured the distance and then compare it to a factory Remington 130gr soft point and they are the same. Later, I measured a Winchester 150gr Power-Point S.P. (with the white tip), and it measures at 3.25".

    I'm concerned about the jump space and/or excess pressure caused by less air in the cartridge. Am I over concerned?

    Bill
     
  2. TwinStick

    TwinStick In the wind Active Member

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    Do you not have calipers? Just curious as to why you would go through all that to measure cartridge OAL. Personally, because I don't know much about max pressure in a .270, I would pull them and start over and set them to 3.25, but I'm not a .270 expert so hopefully someone with more experience with that cartridge will chime in.
     
    Throckmorton likes this.
  3. Cogs

    Cogs Washougal, WA. Volunteer Coordinator Staff Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Of course I have a caliper! I went through all that because I'm new at it and wanted to check and recheck in more ways than one. This is how I learn. Once I know the difference, I'll be fine with a simple one caliper measurement. It was only later, when I saw that the reload was the same length as one factory load, but shorter than an other. Now I wonder if it's okay or not.
     
  4. TwinStick

    TwinStick In the wind Active Member

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    Gotcha, good on you for double checking.

    It is the same length as the lighter factory loaded bullet, but your heavier 140gr at the same length will have more pressure (if the powder charges were equal). Not sure if that means you are in any sort of trouble with your load though. Since you've started with a light charge, you're probably fine, but I'm no expert.

    I was told this morning that a guy at the range I frequent blew up his revolver yesterday with his hand loads. 44 Mag, at least no one was hurt!
     
  5. Cogs

    Cogs Washougal, WA. Volunteer Coordinator Staff Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Thanks for the reply's, Twin. I'm not going to trigger this one until I know a bit more about how it might react.
     
  6. TwinStick

    TwinStick In the wind Active Member

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    That's a good plan
     
  7. Otter

    Otter Oregon - mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Invest in a Hornady lock n load gauge. It is a device to find where your lands/rifling are in relation with the seated bullet. Well worth the money.

    A free option is to scuff a bullet with steel wool and seat it into a dummy round. Start seating it deeper and deeper until you no longer see marks from the lands. For a hunting round I like to seat my bullets between .005 and .020 off the lands. Best to buy a comparator so you measure off the ogive and not the tip.

    I've loaded for two .270 Win rifles and in both cases my bullets ended up seated considerably longer than any factory load I ever bought. I think with the extra long jump you are going with, you are not going to get much accuracy out of it.
     
  8. Cogs

    Cogs Washougal, WA. Volunteer Coordinator Staff Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Thank you, Otter, I value your input. Would you recommend pulling these bullets or go ahead and shoot them up? Yes, I did measure off the tip and now getting the idea that that's not such a good point to go with.

    I think, with the next few loads, I'm simply going to go with the book recommended C.O.A.L. and not worry about it. As I get more experience, I'll refine things to target specific velocities at specific yardage.

    Still, however, I gotta do something with these few loaded with a shorter overall length.

    Bill
     
  9. Otter

    Otter Oregon - mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    If you have a kinetic bullet puller, give them a few wacks until they are seated long, then reseat them with your die so they are closer to the recommended COAL. This will mess up your bullet tension somewhat, but I'd rather do that instead of having such a long jump. I think if you shoot them as is, you are just wasting powder and bullets. I certainly don't think you would learn anything about potential accuracy of the rifle or load shooting them that way.

    You could pull the bullets and start over, and I'm sure some people would suggest that. Myself, I would just adjust the seating depth out and call it good.
     
  10. Cogs

    Cogs Washougal, WA. Volunteer Coordinator Staff Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Good Idea. Sooner or later I'd want to get a puller anyway. Might check around for a loaner if I can't buy one right now. I got time. I'll start my next rounds and deal with these one day soon.

    Thanks again, Otter.

    Bill