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2 of 3 Oregon HS students graduate

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by joken, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. joken

    joken Corvallis Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    57% graduation rate in Portland. Liberal union teachers don't appear to be doing avery good job. Let me guess, its a funding problem!!!
     
  2. locobob

    locobob Beaverton, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Where are you getting this information? I find it very hard to believe that Oregon has a 66% drop out rate.

    P.S. The legal and political section is for issues relating to guns, this kind of stuff should be in off topic.
     
  3. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

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  4. locobob

    locobob Beaverton, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Okay... so I guess the title of the thread is backwards. 2 out of 3 actually graduate or 1 out of 3 drops out - that's a lot more believable. Still a rather sad statistic though.
     
  5. pchewn

    pchewn Beaverton Oregon USA Well-Known Member

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    "4-year graduation rates" ..... So that means any student who takes longer than 4 years (e.g. has to take another class for one term) is NOT counted as graduating.

    It took me 4-1/2 years of college for me to graduate, but I would be counted as not graduated in this type of statistic.

    They are deliberately blowing the numbers out of proportion by limiting it to people who graduate in 4 years.

    Oh, and what about those students who leave HS early or go on to college with or without a HS diploma? They are also NOT 4-year graduates.
     
  6. pinecenega

    pinecenega oregon coast New Member

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    I don't see that many unemployed young people around here. The numbers are ard to believe.
     
  7. ArgentineSteel

    ArgentineSteel Vancouver, WA Active Member

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    I see them. I'm involved with BSA and I know quite a few Eagles who find it tough to get a job lately.
     
  8. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I get so tired of the mind set that it's "always the teachers/systems fault" line of crapola. Are there schools or teachers that are not doing a good job? Undeniably yes. But there is responsibility on the part of students and parents. The issue of kids not graduating is far, FAR more complex than just pointing fingers at the "liberal teacher unions". A teacher can't make a kid learn or come to class or do anything. Heck, even a kid being aggressive towards teachers or other students isn't necessarily reason enough for a teacher to physically intervene.

    Also, the funding comment is crapola. It's much more complex than just throwing out the money issue.

    BTW, if you were a public school student you obviously didn't pay attention in class. Your sentence structure is poor and it should be " a very" rather than "avery". Also, its should be it's as in it is. If you're a home schooler do you really think you should be commenting on public education?????
     
  9. sailorman2010

    sailorman2010 Tri-Cities, WA Member

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    My girlfriend is a teacher in a small school district in Eastern Washington. She is a great teacher and really tries to connect with her students on an individual learning basis, because she knows every student learns differently and at different rates. I should mention she teaches special education classes from really low to really high learning levels and additional help classes in math and english. She also makes herself available after school for group learning sessions on course work. Some students work with her learning styles very well and take advantage of what she offers. But, a majority of her students do not care and will take an “F” grade without batting an eye. An example: she had a project that a few of her classes started in September and were due after the New Year, it added up to about three and half months of time to complete the whole project. It was mostly a homework project, but she gave the students every Wednesday class period to work on it. The day it was due, three out like 35-40 students turned it in. She could not believe it, she saw her students working on it, but they didn’t finish or cared enough to turn it in. It counted for 50-60% of their grade.

    I believe it’s not the fault of the school’s, but of the kids and the parents not taking an active role their kid(s) education. Sure, there are teacher’s that don’t give a rats ***, but that is small minority in my opinion, most teachers become teachers to help kids succeed in learning and in life. Don’t put all the blame on the teachers/unions; put it on the new generation of kids/student not caring.

    I should add, these are middle schoolers (6th-8th grade).
     
  10. joken

    joken Corvallis Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I mistakenly posted 2 of 3 drop out when it should have said 2 of 3 graduate. I do believe that parents are to blame for a good part of this problem. IMO this graduation rate is also because there is no dicipline in the schools. Why go to school when you can stay home and play video games.
     
  11. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Again, why is this the schools fault???? Either the parent allows the kid to stay home and play video games or doesn't know or the kid is making a choice not to go. Schools do their part by taking attendance and calling parents when their kid has skipped. The discipline issue is also parent driven. Parents don't want their kids disciplined either physically or otherwise. My Dad was a high school teacher for 39 years. When he first started he could physically remove a problem student from his room or physically drag them to the principal. Now, a parent would sue and claim their precious little angel was assaulted.
     
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  12. oldbrass

    oldbrass WA Active Member

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    I dropped out and got my GED in 1978 cause I was making more money than my teachers commercial fishing, If I could do it again I`d finish school but those were different times. Still its never kept me from getting a job or going into the military. 99% of job apps say HS grad or equivelant anyway.
    A scary statistic is 1/3 of all hi school seniors can`t pass a GED exam
     
  13. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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    Instead of blaming teachers, you should be blaming Bush for his No Child Left Behind program.
     
  14. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    I currently have five kids in the public education system (with one HS graduate). Me and the wife are VERY involved in what's going on with our kids' education and performance, attitudes and behaviors. I always push my kids to do their best and not "settle" for a just passing grade. All of my kids can easily sail through the work given them with straight A's... if they want to. The main battle we have and the BIG lesson they are going through at the moment is TIME MANAGEMENT. So many Facebook entries and video games... so little time.

    I have one kid who is in the dog house with me because he got a B+ in a particular class, but the teacher comments said he didn't turn in his assignments regularly... NOT GOOD ENOUGH. He had a hard time wrapping his brain around why I was peeved at him, and I explained it like this... I'm one of the best at what I do at work, but if I only did what I do when I felt like it and still expect to get paid regularly, my boss would fire me. I also told him that having the best time or getting the high score on the XBox-360, having a zillion friends on Facebook, or texting and PM-ing on the computer DO NOT go on a job resume.

    I have another kid who got a C+ in Geometry and I'm quite pleased with him. He dragged his arse to "Saturday School" for several weeks, went to school early, stayed after school... he did the best he could and raised his grade from an F to a C+... and that is ALL I have ever asked (told actually) my kids to do... their best. Some parents are too busy trying to be their kids' "friends", some parents just don't give a rip, and I believe MOST parents are just to beat trying to make a living that they have nothing left when they get home and lose sight of things.

    The teachers are generally caught in the middle as public education has been co-opted into a political instrument, plain and simple. The teachers don't get to "choose" what they teach, they are dictated to on WHAT they will teach, HOW they will teach it, and WHEN they will teach it. A lot of the curriculum has been dumbed down to the lowest common denominator because of the "no child left behind" crapola.

    Parents need to step up and take responsibility for their kids. It goes back to the old adage... (figuratively speaking) my kids are more afraid of the "wrath of Dad" than they are of getting shot in the head by a thug wanting their lunch money.

    PS... I went through the public education system, but I actually learned how to read, write and do math!

    (Kevatc, how's my grammar and sentence structure doing? :thumbup: ) :bluelaugh:
     
  15. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    I'm still convinced that if funding for public schools was provided solely by parents who had children in the system, we'd have the best educated kids in the world.
     
  16. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    You know what? I would put my kids in private school in a heartbeat if'n they'd give me back the portion of property taxes that I pay that fund the public system.
     
  17. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    While I'm doing my best to alienate everyone

    I'd also force parents to pay either a fine, or an additional tax if their child does poorly in school, drops out, or vandalizes school property.
     
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  18. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    Amen to that! :thumbup:
     
  19. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    No disagreements there
    I think the entire thing is unfair.
     
  20. coastal steelheader

    coastal steelheader Aberdeen Well-Known Member

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    I'd also reward parents who have children who excel in school. A 50% discount on property taxes, and 20% off on state and federal income tax would be a good way to motivate parents to take interest in their child's education. Rewarding good teachers with a yearly cash bonus, and good schools with a bigger chunk of the pie might not be a bad idea either.