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A couple years ago I was at Cabela's and saw a funny-looking little revolver (used but like new condition) for a price I couldn't pass up. I bought it, shot it once to try it out, and put it in the safe. I took it out to the range today and shot it some more. It shoots pretty good for a cheap gun.

It's a German made EAA Windicator in .357 Magnum. Anyone else have one of these? It's small-ish but heavy because it's solid steel. It's no S&W, but it's not a Hi-Point either.

I have several much nicer .357 Magnum revolvers that get more use at the range, but I think that for the price, this one really isn't bad.

IMG_6689[1].jpg
 
Those revolvers were made by a company named Weihrauch, actually more famous for making air rifles. EAA, European American Armory, is an importer in Florida. They also imported Tanfolgio pistols from Italy, some were branded Witness. The "Windicator" name on this revolver is curious. Vindicator would make more sense to an American; in German the W is pronounced as a V. The German word for vindicator is Verteidiger.

Weihrauch also made a single action revolver for EAA, that one was the Bounty Hunter. I had one of those about 25 years ago, it was a well-made, quality arm. The Weihrauch guns made for EAA were significantly higher quality than Röhm RG guns. Or the Arminius, which was also made by Weihrauch.
 
Darned near ideal carry gun. Let's say you have to drop some armed thug. Gun is gone to evidence for 1-3 years. So what? Any tears shed? Last thing I want to lose is a Python or custom 1911 that will come back dinged up and rusty.
 
Darned near ideal carry gun. Let's say you have to drop some armed thug. Gun is gone to evidence for 1-3 years. So what? Any tears shed? Last thing I want to lose is a Python or custom 1911 that will come back dinged up and rusty.
One of the (many) reasons I sport a Glock of one model or another.


Ubiquitous, effective, dependable, modest cost… doesn't rust to pieces while possibly sitting up on an evidence shelf for years.
 
I had one of these revolvers several years ago and sold it to another member here. Was a really good gun, I just had the opportunity to get into a S&W stainless equivalent.
 
Gun is gone to evidence for 1-3 years. So what? Any tears shed? Last thing I want to lose is a Python or custom 1911 that will come back dinged up and rusty.
👆This.
One of the (many) reasons I sport a Glock of one model or another.

Ubiquitous, effective, dependable, modest cost… doesn't rust to pieces while possibly sitting up on an evidence shelf for years.
Strongly agree and has a large bearing on my EDC's. Also... in the interim... immediately replaceable, right out of the box you're right where you left off and at a cost that's very reasonable.

They are pretty ugly but being able to shoot multiple calibers in multiple configurations with virtually zero adaptation far outweighs aesthetics. Not that having a firearm that is "the most comfortable and customized" isn't nice and all, but training to shoot well with a standardized firearm is much more practical, IMHO.
 
I've looked at those and for the price point and quality seem to be a good deal. Lately I've been looking at new gun purchases and asking myself what will it do that I don't already have? What nitch will it fill? I already have a GP-100 and a Blackhawk in 357 so that covers the caliber. As stated above Glocks make good evidence locker guns and I've got 2 of those. I'm still looking for that "just one more" but am being more selective in that process.
 
It looks to me to be pretty solid and well made, just a fairly simple, cheap design. I had a Rohm revolver a long time ago, and this one is far, far better quality.

As to carrying it, this thing is a hefty chunk of steel. I'd rather carry something lighter. It would make a great home defense gun though. I haven't shot it a lot, but it sure feels solid and reliable.

As far as carrying cheap guns in case it's taken after a self-defense shooting, I have a little different perspective. I don't want either a fancy gun or a cheap gun. I want the best, most practical tool for the job, and if (heaven forbid) I were to ever have to use it, losing the gun would be the very least of my concerns. Fortunately there are a lot of really good options nowadays for carry guns that are common and not expensive, yet very reliable and practical.

I haven't bought a gun in well over a year now. It's been easier than expected, with minimal withdrawals. There's just nothing I need anymore, and lately I've been digging stuff out of the back of the safe that I've forgotten about and haven't shot in a long time.
 
Darned near ideal carry gun. Let's say you have to drop some armed thug. Gun is gone to evidence for 1-3 years. So what? Any tears shed? Last thing I want to lose is a Python or custom 1911 that will come back dinged up and rusty.
It's what happened to my .357 Glock when it got recovered from being stolen and didn't get it back for about 6 years.
Recoil spring was set from having the slide zip tied in the evidence box and had a few surface rust spots on the slide and covered in fingerprint powder, like toner gets everywhere. Got new sights for and a recoil spring assembly and it's good as new.
 
The Windicater is a solid gun. I have yet to hear of one that did not work. the only reason I would not carry one is they are heavy . The point of a small revolver is it carries easily. and the extra weight does not add anything good. The other side of that coin is when practicing the extra weight eats up recoil. DR
 
A couple years ago I was at Cabela's and saw a funny-looking little revolver (used but like new condition) for a price I couldn't pass up. I bought it, shot it once to try it out, and put it in the safe. I took it out to the range today and shot it some more. It shoots pretty good for a cheap gun.

It's a German made EAA Windicator in .357 Magnum. Anyone else have one of these? It's small-ish but heavy because it's solid steel. It's no S&W, but it's not a Hi-Point either.

I have several much nicer .357 Magnum revolvers that get more use at the range, but I think that for the price, this one really isn't bad.

View attachment 1857876
I don't personally have experience with this gun. But I was wondering about getting one recently, and the online reviews turned me off from the idea. Quite a few negative ones, ranging from "bottom of the barrel of budget guns" to multiple reports of cylinders binding up.

I decided against it. But again, not based on personal experience, just reports, so take that for what it's worth.

Sounds like you got a better one though.
 
So far I've shot maybe 150 to 200 rounds through it, mostly magnums but some .38 Special. It shot fine with them all.

I shot it side by side with my Model 19 and Model 28. Of course it doesn't compare to either of those, but it wasn't bad. Accuracy on paper wasn't as good as the S&W guns so it's not a target gun, but it was good enough for what it is.

As far as durability, I doubt I'll ever shoot it enough to really know how it would hold up to a lot of shooting. I figure there's no point in trying to wear out a cheap gun just to see if I can wear it out. When I go to the range to enjoy a bunch of revolver shooting, one or more of the S&W's go with me instead.

I really didn't need this Windicator revolver, but for two hundred bucks it just seemed like I couldn't go wrong. If all I could afford was a $200 gun, I think I'd be plenty happy with this one.
 
A couple years ago I was at Cabela's and saw a funny-looking little revolver (used but like new condition) for a price I couldn't pass up. I bought it, shot it once to try it out, and put it in the safe. I took it out to the range today and shot it some more. It shoots pretty good for a cheap gun.

It's a German made EAA Windicator in .357 Magnum. Anyone else have one of these? It's small-ish but heavy because it's solid steel. It's no S&W, but it's not a Hi-Point either.

I have several much nicer .357 Magnum revolvers that get more use at the range, but I think that for the price, this one really isn't bad.

View attachment 1857876
Is the frame steel or zamac? I know the german rg revolvers of old were zamac.
 
Is the frame steel or zamac? I know the german rg revolvers of old were zamac.
All steel, no Zamac in this one. About the only thing it has in common with the old RG guns is the country of manufacture.

It does look like the trigger guard and barrel shroud are aluminum. The barrel itself is a steel tube. The design is fairly simple, reminds me a lot of a Charter Arms gun. I was in Sportsman's Warehouse today, and noticed one of these there. New price there is $450, more than I'd pay for one. I must have happened on a rare Cabela's good deal when I picked mine up.
 
@CLT65 , I just picked up one of these for a possible hike/pack gun. Mind if I ask what holster you are using if any?
I haven't looked into a holster for it. I have a lot of handguns without holsters. I'm too cheap to spend money on holsters for guns I most likely won't carry. Not that it's not worth carrying. If you find a good one that fits it, let me know. :)
 

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