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1968 - 1970 Ford Pickup: Looking for Information

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by strongtower6114, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. strongtower6114

    strongtower6114 Pierce, Washington Member

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    I'm looking into getting a fifth generation ford pickup for several reasons.

    1. Simple and easy to work on without specialized tools/shop.
    2. Well built, American made truck for hauling stuff.
    3. EMP resistant/proof.

    If anyone has any experience with them, specifically with half/three-quarter ton sizes, engines sizes, etc. I would be grateful.
     
  2. Sirjefferyredman

    Sirjefferyredman Oregon New Member

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    i own a 77 ford and is has the 300 straight 6 is bullet prof never gives me trouble and 16 miles to the gallon on top of that
     
  3. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

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    I used to have a 1976 F150, non 4x4, straight 6 engine. I regret selling it.

    Peter
     
  4. mosinguy1

    mosinguy1 out by the ocean Active Member

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    I have a '76 F-350 1 ton gas mileage is 12 mpg no matter what
     
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  5. 01rednavigator

    01rednavigator salem Active Member

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    I used to own a 1968 F250 Camper Special Custom cab. I loved that truck, you cannot find a more reliable easy to work on truck! If you do not want a 4X4 look for a 2wd camper special, they have very strong springs in the rear so they can haul a ton of weight.

    I did a ton of work to my 68 f250 so if you have any other specific questions let me know.

    Here are some pics of my 1968 F250


    truck1.jpg

    truck10.jpg

    truck12.jpg

    truck8.jpg

    engine1.jpg

    engine3-1.jpg


    steeringwheel1.jpg
     
  6. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    Do not get one with a 360 (bad milage and not good motor) the 390 or 352 are a better choice. If you are wanting to haul smaller loads then the 300-6 is the best as stated above. Pay close attention to what gears are in the rear also, alot of these have been geared for wood hauling and are bad on milage and not so good going down the highway (high RPM).

    If you want an easy fix for the points system the Pertronix set up directly replaces the points and uses the original cap/rotor and can be switched back just as easily. When looking ask if the valve seats have been redone with hardened ones to compensate for unleaded fuel or add an additive when you fill up. If you by chance are looking at one with a 302 check the crank shaft end play as this is not a great motor for a truck (dont ask how I know this).
     
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  7. notazombie

    notazombie Hillsboro Well-Known Member

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    Tough old trucks. I've worked on many and owned a '71 for a while. I'll agree with several of the others. The 300-6 is near impossible to kill and would be my first choice for anything short of a freeway commuter. The only issues that seem to pop up with any regularity is a loose carb base or leaking intake/exhaust gasket. Both pretty easy fixes. I've never been a huge fan of the FE engines. They're OK for durability but are pretty thirsty and always seem to have an exhaust leak. Best part about working on these old Fords is the nice flat inner fenders for resting tools and parts while you're working on them:winkkiss:.
     
  8. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    seem to recall the early ignition electronics on these being a bit unreliable
     
  9. kibs45

    kibs45 Portland Active Member

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    I owned a 73 1/2 ton and loved it. 360 with the 3 speed auto. Great truck. I believe it was 1973 that they added EGR, so watch for that to know about how old the engine is. There are the inline sixes which have a reputation of being bullet proof. There are small block V-8s up to 351 ci. The Y-Block 352-428 ci. Then the big block 429-460. There are some weaker and stronger performers amongst the groups, but I would say it is difficult to go wrong. About the only issue with these trucks is that the exhaust manifold studs tend to stick, which is actually a common issue among older engines, so no big deal. It doesn't matter which engine you get I would expect poor fuel mileage. My 2wd long bed 360 auto delivered about 8 miles to the gallon regardless of how I drove it, whether or not it was loaded to the gills. 8. I was always partial to the 390 though.
     
  10. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    Chevy has all of the same positive attributes, but the 327/350 small blocks are way more reliable than a Ford 352/360. Parts for Chevy small blocks are available everywhere at cheap prices. I used to race circle track cars and a $1500 Chevy small block was competitive with Fords that cost $5K. The Chevy small block would last a season or two, even at 13:1 compression, whereas the Ford guys would go through a couple engines a year even at 3 times the price. Also, Chevy made a 260 and a 300 in-line 6.
     
  11. FullCaliberII

    FullCaliberII Pierce County, WA Active Member

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    I've owned several of the 1967-1972 Fords... Two 69 F250, one 1970 F250, and one 1972 F100. Now I'm lucky enough to have a 71 Bronco.
    These trucks are fantastic. Simple and reliable. The 360/390 FE engines are powerful and spare parts are plentiful. I would buy another without hesitation.
     
  12. kibs45

    kibs45 Portland Active Member

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    If I remember correctly the SB Chevy is a Oversquare engine, and most of the Fords tended to run Undersquare. I won't argue that a Chevy is a viable option, because they are fine. I would imagine that oversquare engines are more suited to circle track racing though IMO.
     
  13. notazombie

    notazombie Hillsboro Well-Known Member

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    I concur. The '67-'72 Chevy/GMC 3/4tons were well built. Seems like 6s were less common though (I think you meant 250 & 292) unless they were in 2wd 1/2tons. I've always thought the late 60s-early 70s Internationals were pretty over-built. Although prices have climbed in recent years there are still deals out there and you seem to get more truck for the money compared to the Fords and GMs.

    Strongtower; Have you considered an early '80s F250 with a diesel in it? It covers all your requirements. Not sure that it's 100% EMP proof but probably could be made that way pretty easily if it isn't. I believe the fuel control system is fairly simple and there is no ignition system. Basically a street legal tractor.
     
  14. kibs45

    kibs45 Portland Active Member

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    I know they tend to run expensive and I am not a fan of the truck, but if what you want is a solid engine with minimal electrics, the Dodges with the Cummins diesels didn't have ECMs to run the engine until the 24 valve variety in 98.5. So anything pre 98.5 with the 12 valve should have essentially a shut down solenoid, and maybe a grid heater for cold start, plus the usual sensors. Fuel control though was all mechanical either via a Bosch VE or P pump.
     
  15. 01rednavigator

    01rednavigator salem Active Member

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  16. kibs45

    kibs45 Portland Active Member

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    The 360 and 390 are essentially the same engine, but the 390 pistons are also different. The skirts had to be relieved for piston to crank clearance, where the 360 has pistons that utilize full skirts IIRC. I also heard rumors that the original cam gear in the 360 was not metal where the 390 was. I can not say for sure, I never tore mine down that far. I never had issues with my 360 (other than it being an old farm truck), I loved it.
     
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  17. slingshot1943

    slingshot1943 salem or Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for this info. I have a 1996 and didn't know this.
     
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  18. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    There is absolutely nothing wrong with a 360 or a 302. A Duraspark setup costs about as much as a Pertronix unit, is less failure-prone and replacement parts (if ever actually needed) can be purchased at ANY auto parts store, unlike a Pertronix unit, which are fairly fragile.
     
  19. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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  20. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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