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1911 Norinco "What the Heck?"

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by PolishedBrass, Oct 30, 2011.

  1. PolishedBrass

    PolishedBrass Gresham, Oregon Active Member

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    I just got a 1911 ... wanted a good base to work from with forged parts.
    Didn't want to do much beyond reliable and 25' 3" groups.

    So I got a Norinco. The actual wear is like about 500 or so rounds on it.

    I have still yet to shoot it. But "what the heck" ... I have never seen this setup inside a 1911 (I have limited 1911 exposure ... Just a ParaOrdinance.)


    Please help by answering a couple questions (if you are knowledgeable.)
    Is this a stock Norinco guide rod and barrel?
    Is it some crap adons or some decent upgrade? (The buffertech recoil buffer is my add-on)
    What is with that guide rod?
    And what is with the internal spring inside the guide rod? (towards the back of it.)

    I really appreciate the help. It all seems solid enough and I don't think it will explode when I shoot it.

    BTW-I did some light polishing of critical contact surfaces with some 400 wet dry ... and the metal doesn't seem as hard as I expected.


    Please tell me something positive ... like ... "Dude this is the way Norinco's come, funky guide rod and all, though that internal spring is weird ... it helps with felt recoil ... so your good to go ... range it and if it shoots well then your fine ... if not toss that stupid comp bushing and consider a match bushing ... barrels on those are ok ... but you might want to consider changing that as well."

    Or something to give me a sense of peace and that I did not get scammed.

    DSCF0287.jpg
    DSCF0289.jpg
     
  2. saabin

    saabin Eugene Active Member

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    I remember coming across a device like that a while back that was suppose to apply pressure to the barrel lug for a better more consistent lockup, or so they claimed. I cant remember who was selling it and to be honest I am not 100% sure that is what you have but it looked something like that.

    Edit: On a second look it appears what you have is some kind of two stage recoil buffer.
     
  3. PolishedBrass

    PolishedBrass Gresham, Oregon Active Member

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    I can't find it online anywhere ... but can find "Guide rod recoil reducers" with the same idea.

    Barrel looks authentic. The recoil reducer may well be an early prototype ...

    I will take off the Buffertech and see what it does on its own.

    After tuning and smoothing critical wear points I lubed it up with Tetra gun grease.
     
  4. BillM

    BillM Amity OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The barrel, and what I can see of the frame and slide look Norinco.

    The goofy guide rod set-up, worthless compensator bushing and the
    recoil spring plug with a rectangular hole--I've never seen them on
    any Norinco.

    Norinco's come stock with a GI recoil system. Short rod, solid (no hole)
    recoil plug, standard bushing. A little rough, but serviceable and a good
    platform to build something better on.

    FWIW--if those parts are orientated in the picture like they were
    assembled, your recoil spring is backwards. Closed end goes toward
    the rod, open end toward the plug.
     
  5. PolishedBrass

    PolishedBrass Gresham, Oregon Active Member

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    Yeah ... looks to have both features. The design is brute simple and of decent materials. It just looked "prototype" or hokey ... but in all it feels solid and does feel like it will reduce the slam of the slide some.

    Will know after I range it.
     
  6. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

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    Comparing it to my Norinco 1911, the only internal part of yours that looks stock is the barrel itself.

    Shoot it and see what happens. If there's any problems you could always convert it back to stock relatively cheaply. In their stock form they actually make a very functional 1911. It's not much to look at though.