Form for selling a firearm to private party?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by bignate, Jul 12, 2009.

  1. bignate

    bignate Member

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    Is there a form that I can use when selling a gun to a private party? I want one that says that they can own a gun, not a felon, ect.


    thanks nate
  2. Kaltbluter

    Kaltbluter Member

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  3. Diamondback

    Diamondback Active Member

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    I'll see about getting the form I use as a buyer converted to PDF and uploaded in the next couple days.

    Mine incorporates statements by both buyer and seller, is to be signed by both, and each side leaves with half the form--so that in case some schmuck pulls a Katrina Gun Grab and needs a receipt to return, hopefully mine'll cover it.

    ----------------
    Now playing: Jerry Goldsmith - The Hotel
    via FoxyTunes
  4. toys

    toys Member

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    there is a OR state form thats almost like the 4473. Its blue in color. You should be able to get it from one of the gun shows or you can try the local PD/State PD.

    btw, you call in and give the same info as the 4473. there is also a fee associated with it you have to send in.

    all of the info is on the form.
  5. emanon

    emanon Member

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    It should be noted that while it is probably a good idea to create our own records like these, it is NOT a legal requirement to do so for private firearms transfers (excluding those done at gun shows) in Oregon at this time. I believe that the same is true in Washington, Idaho and Nevada. If I understand correctly, pretty much all firearms transfers in California have to go through a licensed dealer anyway...
  6. elsullo

    elsullo Banned

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    That form is ideal for a private background check. For a ten-dollar credit card fee the State Police looks up the buyer, seller, and weapon to make sure all are legit, then gives you a confirmation number for the approval. You fill out the form with all the info (maybe fill out two so that the buyer has one for a receipt), then make the call, and the number is on the form. Approval is usually friendly and very quick. The seller must keep that form for ten years as a legal record of the sale.

    You can take a few copies of the Blue Form from any Gunshow office desk, they are free. The State Police might also tell you where else to find them. The buyer must assume that the gun is de-facto registered with the State, even though we "have no registration" in Oregon.......................elsullo :thumbup:
  7. bignate

    bignate Member

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    Thanks guys! I found what I was looking for. I just like to have a piece of paper so if something happened with the gun I can have some kind of record of who I sold it to.


    nate
  8. Teufel_Hunden

    Teufel_Hunden Active Member

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    My one question would be why? Don't get me wrong in some cases I understand why one would want a paper trail but since we have no registration how can the seller be required (by the state??) to keep records for anything?

    Sounds like another one of those deals where it's highly encouraged but if there is no law mandating paperwork for a FTF transaction how can they require anything?

    LOL
  9. markw76

    markw76 Member

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    CYA more than anything. Once you take the step of utilizing the state background check, I would think it was on them, but I'm no lawyer. If you were the purchaser of the firearm from an FFL it's YOU they will come visit should they come looking for it. Be nice to have something to point them elsewhere, and the OSP number to confirm it.

    I thought the state was required to dispose of those records after some amount of time, but nobody should assume that is being done. Records like that have a way of persisting.
  10. tionico

    tionico Active Member

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    Federal regs require a licensed FFL to keep their copy of the yellow form (the NCIS check/FBI form) twenty years. Or, turn it over to BATF if they close their doors sooner than that. In Washington, the Department of Licensing keeps a record of all handgun sales through dealers, as well as the local Sheriff's Dept, and the dealer, three copies. The dealer also has to keep the yellow FBI check form, just as with a long gun... two different documents per transaction, for pistols.

    Since Oregon does their own background checks through a state agency, they are not under Federal laws to destroy the NCIS check date within 24 hours. I've heard different stories on whether the State keeps those records.... and I tend to believe those who claim they do keep them. But, as far as I've learned, there is no data base... inn other words, if YOU buy a gun in Oregon, they have no way of looking up YOUR name, or the serial number of a specific gun, in a statewide base. BUT-- if they decide to check a given record, they will have all that info. Of course, its only money (and the threat of public outcry/court cases that keeps them from doing exactly this.
  11. markw76

    markw76 Member

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    Yep. I think state law prescribes how long the records can be kept, but there is always that little "Oops Factor". I have no idea what the current state of OSP record keeping is on this. Law Enforcement tends to want much longer preservation of such records, but that invites abuse.